Review: The Bitcoin Standard: The Decentralized ...

Amir Taaki - Breaking Bitcoin presentation (transcript)

Below I transcribed Amir's talk from Breaking Bitcoin (see previous post here, start of presentation (youtube): here). Excuse the errors (will fix if you point me to them).
What was most interesting for me:
Amir:
Thank you for having me here.
I believe that ideas play an important role in shaping human history. What I want to talk about is how technology has been shaped by key ideas. In particular how certain mechanical ideas of human society got mixed up with with politics and technology.
What I want to talk about is the free technology movement. It was a movement that showed great potential promise to liberate humanity. At the heart of it was a idea that technology offered a new way to construct a radially different kind of society that never before was possible in history, this movement was influenced by the visions of early scientists who believed in the power of computer technology not just to serve large industry and military but everybody to have access to this new power.
Influenced of by the 60s counterculture, this movement went on to develop the first personal computers. But that's not the end of the story because this radical vision mutated into the idea of self-regulating systems which see human beings as object managed by computer algorithms. In this vision, the value of human ideas to transform the world was diminished into a strange kind of consensus where everybody satisfies their personal desires.
We now find ourselves in a strange static dreamworld while dark forces are returning to threaten to penetrate our reality and all of the dreams of the techno-utopiasts play the role in creating this fake virtual world in which human beings driven by desires, devoid of all sense of higher purpose become slaves to algorithms and vast computer intelligences.
What is interesting about this story is the significance it has for Bitcoin. A project which is created for the purpose of creating a decentralized peer-to-peer money that cannot be controlled by governments and central banks but which now finds itself monopolized by large mining cartels. A lack of vision to guide the project forwards and increasing irrelevance in a world facing a global breakup of power.
Lastly I want to explain my project to revitalize the free technology movement to formulate a wider vision to restore back the potential of the technology to transform human society and train the next generation of revolutionary hackers dedicated to the cause of using the technology to support the cause of freedom.
My aim here is to find sponsors, find the place for establishing our hacker Academy, to find partner organisations to develop new technology projects with and to find people ready to dedicate themselves in advancing the free technology movement. People ready to be at the forefront of writing history.

At the heart of this story lies a conflict between two men in 1968. One of them is good B.F. Skinner, the other is good Lewis Mumford. It was one moment when two ideas about how technology could be used to advance human society first XXX ((unintelligible)) to take hold.
There's a documentary from this time made in mid-60s called "Towards tomorrow". And in this documentary, it described two possible future visions for human society. In a society where old forms of authority were declining, what would be the way that we could organize masses of human beings in a future society.
One of these visions for this society was a world managed by an elite group of technocrats, a specialized elite who managed a large population of passive human beings who constantly needed to be monitored and managed to be able to to keep them happy. B.F. Skinner described a new way of controlling and ordering people. He posed the question in this age of mass democracy and individualism the old forms of coercion was simply not possible and he put forth the idea of using reward. And he described an experiment where you have a cage with a pigeon inside and the pigeon can be trained to peck symbols, buttons, and depending on which symbol they peck, they get a pellet of food. In this way, by giving the pigeons the right reward for the correct behavior, they train the pigeon as a mechanical object.
He then took this farther and he went to a mental hospital in San Bernardino in California and in the mental hospital, what they did is they gave the mental patients small reward every time they did a good behavior. With this reward, when it was a lunch time or a dinner time, the patients could sit at a nicer table. So, inside the mental hospital, they created a new ordered hierarchy from a system of reward in which people don't feel controlled but feel empowered. Skinner describes this model as a model for the future of humanity. What's really interesting about this video by Skinner is it there's something very eerily similar to what we see today in which there is a technocratic elite that has interest in politics only in managing human society to keep us happy to keep everything stable and to keep themselves rich. A lot of this was powered in the mid-80s with the fake consumer credit to reward us as a form of social management - much like the experiment with the hospital, the mental hospital.
Lewis Mumford put forward an alternative vision for a society. In this video I'm going to show you - he first criticises Skinner and then he puts forward an alternative vision where everybody in the society is a participant. Everybody is an active human being deciding their destiny.

There were many forms the computer could have taken. In 1800s, the computer was proposed by Babbage. And popularized by Ada Lovelace. It was seen as a tool that would have huge social uses and that should be in the hands of many people, but when the computer was first developed during WWII - for cracking German codes for the military and for guiding ballistic missiles - computers became a very large centralized machine.
By the 80s, communities of hackers started to emerge which started to be fascinated with these huge machines - which at the time you had to get the time slice, to get the appointment to get to get some time to use the machine - they started to get jobs near these computing devices, because they wanted to know how these machines could work. They started to build their own computers in their garages, in their houses and universities - and that was the birth of the personal computers, the reason why we now have laptops and telephones.
What happened was: a lot of big companies started to come along and they started to invest a lot of capital. All of the hacker community - who up until that point had never seen money before in their life - to throw themselves at, at the proprietary industry. And whereas before the culture that had created this personal computers, this liberatory technology, really believed in power to use the technology to improve the humanity for the better, who really believed in free technology, in sharing techniques and code with each other - instead became siloed off.
But there was one guy - Richard Stallman - he was just a guy - he found this ethically wrong. If enough people got together, we could give a challenge against the proprietary industry. He made that as a proposal to the community - that it doesn't have to be this way, if we together put our energies we can build our own operating system. A lot of people at that time thought that he was crazy or that his ideas weren't feasible.
This is early video of Richard Stallman.

So, in 1991, the cryptography was classified as ammunitions and Philip Zimmermann wrote the first freely available encryption software for anybody to use and he uploaded it to the Internet. The American government arrested him and he was facing a decade in prison. What Philip Zimmerman did was to print the source code of PGP - of this encryption software - which he sold internationally, which is something that in America is protected under the First Amendment. And the American government was realizing that they couldn't continue with the case, they dropped the case. And since that time, because of the action of Philip Zimmermann, software became classified as a form of speech. And cryptography became widely available. It's now reason why cryptography is available everywhere.
Also, in early 90s, Stallman has started to piece together his operating system. And by now a community a community of people has emerged around him. It was the birth of Linux - a really important piece of technology. Not just in the free technology world, but in general, in hi-tech space it place a very key role. And that was a rise of the whole bunch of movements: free software movement, hacker movement, crypto-anarchist movement. Movements were invigorated with creating a lot of new ideas and a lot of new concepts about how we could use the technology to shape the world around us. These were collective movements driven by the shared sense of purpose.
Towards the end of the 90s (the baby boomer generation), the western society became overly optimistic. Something the Jean Baudrillard called 'the dead of society' and 'obsession with desert-like forms / with the simulacrum'.
Stallman free software movement failed to capitalize on institutionalizing his movement. And what happen was what emerged was the open source movement. It was a movement that said: making this technology is not a question of freedom/ethics, it's simply when you have access to source code of a program it's more efficient, it's cheaper, it makes more quality code. I don't think that's true, but that was their argument. One of the main spokesmen was Eric Raymond who released a book called 'A cathedral and a bazaar'. In that book, Eric Raymond has described the open source development philosophy as open bazaar where everybody, dozens or hundreds of people, a wide number of people all collaborated in a horizontal manner. He coined an idea that given enough eyes all bugs are shallow. When we have a piece of source code, if there are enough people - all contributing a small amount of time and looking at the source code - then if there is a bug, that bug will be found. The idea that given a huge amount of people with a small amount of contribution of each, that we can develop projects and advance technology.
Then what happened was the biggest event in the modern western history - which was the collapse of the twin towers, the twin idols of capitalism, perfect in a reflections, reaching into the skyline of New York - which realized our deepest most hidden desires to see the destruction of this passive lifeless world. And what it represented was the return of the real (of the) dark forces - that we ignored - back to penetrate into our reality.
In early 2000s we saw a lot of optimism and momentum for change. We saw the Arab spring, we saw The occupy, we saw the orange revolutions. In the technology world, we saw a lot of advances, there was a huge amount of optimism for Linux on the desktop. Every year the people were saying: this is going be the year of the desktop. Everybody was waiting for that sudden single breakthrough. One of the major developments in technology world was the confrontation that took place between Hollywood and a Manhattan programmer called Bram Cohen. ((...)) He developed BitTorrent. The concept started with sites like Napster or Kazaa - that were centralized services that were shut down by authorities.
Cohen came up with a concept: if enough people downloading files and seeding them at the same time - then the more people that download the file the more that file will become widely distributed in the network. So, that file will become shared in a self-regulating network. It was a big success and the movie studios didn't know what to do about this, they were completely powerless in face of this technology. The idea of creating a functional self-regulating system outside of power proved itself and it's something wildly popular among technologists.
The next major development is the shutdown of the Pirate bay which led to the development of the Pirate party that at one point had double digits in elections and even entered into the EU parliament. There is huge momentum behind it. Wikipedia was also developed - the idea that given thousands and thousands of people all contributing small edits, one line at time, could build this huge knowledge resource . Around this movements started to emerge the new priests of this internet-centric decentralization technology - people like Yochai Benkler, academics who would go to conferences and sell this ideology to people.
But something strange started to emerge. Wikipedia released statistics about edits on Wikipedia. We found that it was a small group of dedicated people that wrote the majority of Wikipedia, people who really believed in the project and spent all their time writing the majority of the articles on the website. When we started to look closer at these decentralized systems, what we observed was small groups of leaders surrounded by a wider community. In BitTorent, it wasn't that everybody was seeding in the network. Most people, after they downloaded, didn't continue to run the software. In fact, it was a small group of users, who wanted to challenge Hollywood and promote BitTorrent, who would leave their software running seeding torrents.
In open source, we observed that there were small groups of dedicated developers in a project surrounded by wider community. And in fact, what Stallman has done was not just to write Linux and put that in the community, but he had written articles, he had written manifestos, he had put forward a vision and an ideology that pulled together enough people and drove this movement of hackers forwards.
So what drove these projects for freedom was not a new model or a new technique. It was a vision that pulled together enough people to realize an idea. To understand why Occupy and Arab Spring and orange revolutions and the Pirate Party and a lot of these movements had a huge of amount of will and movement - fail, it's really instructive to understand what happened to Egypt. In Egypt, huge amounts of youths started to mobilize through Facebook and they started to go to this center in Cairo to front the military dictatorship. Huge amount of people died in that struggle. And after they threw out ((?)) the military dictatorship, the youth then sat down and said: "Okay, now what we are gonna do? What's next?". So they started to discuss.
And into that, came a group of people, with a vision, with an ideology, that was well organized and able to pull together enough strands of the society behind them. But they could put their vision into power. And that was the Muslim Brotherhood.
And then the same youth hood - that kicked out the military dictatorship - came back to the square to ask the military dictatorship to come back and rescue them from the Islamists.
At the same time, Satoshi developed Bitcoin. I remember on Satoshi's early website he described it as a peer-to-peer form of money that cannot be controlled by central banks and governments. And it's something that attracted libertarians, cryptographers and hackers. Bitcoin is kind of a technology - free technology project - that was a little late to the party. Interestingly, it finds itself in the same place as the movements that preceded it. The fundamental problem with Bitcoin is not a problem of missing this or that technology, it's a problem of a lack of vision, a lack of how this technology is -
And it's not just about Bitcoin - it's something to do with the wider technology movement. We have to understand the global situation now. Humanity is facing a future with a huge amount of suffering. We are facing the threats from terrorism, from immigration. There's the rise of new ideological movements - ISIS just went and took a city in southern Philippines for more than a month - which is right next to Indonesia, the biggest Muslim country in the world. And in Europe the new right movement is getting very strong, organizing training camps, becoming well-organized, getting into political power and well-funded. This is the reality of our situation now.
We have to think about how this technologies that we make -, where do they situate themselves in the wider global context.
In Rojava, there is also a really important movement with the ideology of democratic confederalism which is the way forward from anarchism. And offers a really good analysis of what is the current society and what is the crisis that we're facing. And how, in that place, revolutionaries from all over the world are going to learning the methodology and ideology of this movement. It's a new emerging movement outside of any one person's control, but new forces can be harnessed. What we have to understand is that anarchist movement and the hacker movement is something deeply connected. The problem with anarchism is that it failed in it's potential to advance humanity forward, it's simply an ideology that no longer is able to work. What we have in Rojava is a libertarian revolution of 5 million people. What is democratic confederalism? It's an ideological movement that opposes the state as a mechanical worldview and sees the nature as something that is divine, that seeks to restore the balance back between internal+subjective and external+material world. The freedom comes from reaching our destiny as human beings, not simply through pleasure seeking. (Liberalism is the destruction of the free society.) And the better humanity it's not simply a happier humanity but stronger freer humanity. The crisis in the West not simply an economic crisis, but social crisis - we're facing a deep cultural issue.
All of the ideas in hacker movement - such as BitLaw, digital governance, cryptographic economy, decentralized organization, new economic models, new technical tools - unless we are able to take all of these concepts and put them into a plan, with a sense of direction, that we can put these into practice - then it's something that's going to be lost. Now, what's presenting itself is a massive opportunity for hackers to put their ideas into practice.
So, right now we are building a hacker team. There's 3 tasks we have to do: study of all the ideas and concepts in technology. From this study we have to develop a long- term plan. And thirdly, we have to devote ourselves to build the technical base of this new emerging democratic confederalism movement, we have to create revolutionary hackers dedicated to the course. If we don't, then all of the technology we are making is outside of the society, it's a toy, and what is relevant in this world is not making new products to fill the spaces in the environment around us, but using technology to shape politics that influence the world around us.
This revolution in North Syria or Rojava is the biggest opportunity in the entire history of modernity. Through this we can give direction to the hacker movement. One of our main projects is a Bitcoin project. We have a nation of 5 million people and - and - and there is a financial situation where they're under financial embargo, they use - , they don't have the financial infrastructure so they use paper money and Syrian Lira is inflating massively. Because there's embargo so you can't send money in and out. Also there is a project to create decentralized economy and there's a lot of real concrete uses for Bitcoin. And also the ideology of the revolutionary nation is in line with the vision and values of the Bitcoin.
When we decide to look at deploying Bitcoin, what we realize is that Bitcoin is not ready and there's a lot of new things that need to be developed in Bitcoin, they should make it so it's able to be deployed on a scale of 5 million people. We are assembling a project to deploy Bitcoin as the national currency of Rojava. We want to create new products in practical use on a large scale. Products that solve real problems and serve the cause of freedom.
Towards this goal, we're assembling a team of 20 hackers dedicated for two years. We're looking to establish links with companies and sponsors to make this happen. The first step is to establish a hacker's academy in Greece - to train groups of revolutionary self-sufficient hackers that we're going to deploy on projects. Our needs now: partners, sponsors, space, support.
Our first plan is to setup exchange shops and localized wallets in Bitcoin where people come buy vouchers and use Bitcoin to create a local Bitcoin market. We have to create brochures, lots of information. Once this system gets bigger, then we also need to think of bigger financial infrastructure - so one of the things is paper wallets. At the moment, 100 thousands paper wallet cost $6000. Unfortunately the counterfeiting measures on the paper wallets aren't very well made. There needs to be a lot research done. There is a small USB device called ESP 12 which can be programmed with micro Python and C and it has on-board Wi-Fi, plus you can fit modules for radio. Through that you can create a large scale payments networks with cheap consumer devices that cost fie dollars each for people to transact bitcoins.
There is also a big market for Bitcoin because sending money between Rojava and Istanbul currently costs 5 %. Later, we also can create plastic card system where we print cards and also establish payments network using radio systems. There needs to be a lot of development and investigations in Lightning Networks and other technologies.
This is why I [want to ((?))] have a laboratory - if I take a group of people there - I can create all kinds of technology projects and a lot of concepts we've been theorizing for a long time. We can see that it works practically.
There is also the project of the Pirates to create liquid democracy - there is a system of local councils in every neighborhood which - , a lot of these digital platforms that have been developed for many years - we can deploy them. There was also the economy being based on cooperatives - all of the ideas about economic management, about collective management of resources about using cryptography and currencies to manage cooperatives. These all things we can deploy - but what it's going to take is a group of people who's doing this research, who's going deep - not only in terms of developing new concepts - but looking back into the literature about what were - , what is the history of the movement, where we situated it and also what are the concepts and how we can apply them towards our goal.
I'm gonna to finish my talk on that. Does anybody have questions?
submitted by vbenes to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: AskEconomics posts from 2018-09-23 to 2018-12-09 01:20 PDT

Period: 76.83 days
Submissions Comments
Total 982 5230
Rate (per day) 12.78 67.37
Unique Redditors 702 946
Combined Score 5730 16211

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  1. 366 points, 45 submissions: benjaminikuta
    1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? (68 points, 12 comments)
    2. Do powerful unions increase wages above the optimal level, or do firms with market power cause imperfect competition in the labor market, causing sub optimal wages? (Or both?) (29 points, 2 comments)
    3. How do the salaries of high paid professionals compare between the US and various other developed countries? (28 points, 1 comment)
    4. Just how much more expensive is it to build on mountainous terrain than on flat land? How much more expensive would housing have to be before it's economical to develop the mountains of Hong Kong? (27 points, 5 comments)
    5. When it is said that someone in a third world country lives on a dollar a day, what does that actually mean? (25 points, 19 comments)
    6. How do economists measure unpaid work? (23 points, 8 comments)
    7. What's the economic effect of legal vs illegal immigration? (22 points, 10 comments)
    8. If someone saved enough money to live on investment income, could their descendants live off it indefinitely? (Assuming they don't spend the principle, reinvest to account for inflation, etc, of course.) (20 points, 46 comments)
    9. How effectively can negative externalities be quantified? (11 points, 7 comments)
    10. What are some common misconceptions about economics? (11 points, 19 comments)
  2. 134 points, 11 submissions: Fart_Gas
    1. Is free public transport a good idea? (42 points, 20 comments)
    2. What caused the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis? (31 points, 13 comments)
    3. Would it be more economical for supermarkets to slightly under-stock? (21 points, 12 comments)
    4. Will Venezuela's plummeting economy make it a good choice for low-wage industries? (20 points, 8 comments)
    5. What might cause sudden inflation? (7 points, 2 comments)
    6. Why do some countries without hyperinflation use a foreign currency in everyday life? (7 points, 3 comments)
    7. Has any country tried reducing the minimum wage, and ended up with a good result from it? (4 points, 8 comments)
    8. Is Ordoliberalism feasible for most poor and recently war-torn countries? (1 point, 0 comments)
    9. Why do some businesses sponsor sporting teams in countries they don't operate in, and that they don't plan to expand to in the foreseeable future? (1 point, 1 comment)
    10. Is it inevitable that certain areas will never recover from a war? If so, why? (0 points, 0 comments)
  3. 96 points, 5 submissions: MrZer
    1. Why do countries like France or Japan have a high debt to GDP but aren't in shambles like Greece? (43 points, 16 comments)
    2. Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians? (22 points, 18 comments)
    3. I've heard Marxists claim that central planning is good because the military and corporations do it. (20 points, 38 comments)
    4. Someone once said "Interest is what actually creates money. Without debt and interest, our economies would collapse." (7 points, 5 comments)
    5. What does it mean when people say China manipulates currency? (4 points, 7 comments)
  4. 83 points, 17 submissions: Whynvme
    1. Do economists actually calculate consumer surplus empirically, or is it more of s theoretical concept? (19 points, 5 comments)
    2. If we have cobb douglas preferences, my demand for x is not a function of the price of y. How do substitution effects arise then? (13 points, 6 comments)
    3. Is me making more money than I would necessarily require to work( so more than my 'opportunity wage') for a job an economic inefficiency? or is ineffiency in labor markets a wedge between my marginal revenue product and my wage? (11 points, 3 comments)
    4. some basic macro questions (6 points, 5 comments)
    5. understanding equilibrium in a dynamic context? (6 points, 1 comment)
    6. Trying to understand economies of scale, e.g. costco (5 points, 5 comments)
    7. Why does inflation necessarily mean wages will be increasing too? (5 points, 3 comments)
    8. question about equilibrium tax incidence (3 points, 1 comment)
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    10. when firms are earning short run economic profit, does that just mean all factors of production are earning more than their opportunity cost? so firms entering the industry = labor and capital reallocating towards that industry by forming new firms? (3 points, 1 comment)
  5. 65 points, 1 submission: imadeadinside
    1. If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises (65 points, 16 comments)
  6. 57 points, 2 submissions: csObsession
    1. Do most economists think political and economic freedoms are intrinsically tied together? How do they explain the success of extremely authoritarian capitalist governments (Singapore, China, South Korea, Chile)? (37 points, 25 comments)
    2. Why are salaries for professionals so much higher in the United States than other developed countries? (20 points, 34 comments)
  7. 53 points, 13 submissions: Experimentalphone
    1. Why do Information Technology workers are so high in demand and earn so much in Western countries but doesn't even get sustenance wage in Bangladesh? (30 points, 10 comments)
    2. Anyone know of a comprehensive list of all the sub disciplines one can do a PhD in Economics, Finance and Business? (6 points, 4 comments)
    3. Which PhD sub disciplines have the least math but still good employability prospects in academia and industry? (5 points, 19 comments)
    4. What is the best website to publish your working papers in Economics? (3 points, 4 comments)
    5. Do I have to prove factual assertions before providing my arguments on economic policy suggestions for a journal article? (2 points, 4 comments)
    6. Why is the Ready Made Garments industry of Bangladesh declining due to withdrawal of trade privileges of Western countries when prices are already competitive in the world market? (2 points, 1 comment)
    7. Are qualitative policy prescription papers accepted by most journals or are they better of in blog posts? (1 point, 7 comments)
    8. What is the best free website for working papers in Economics? (1 point, 3 comments)
    9. Where can I find data on work conditions and how hard is the work of foreign students who work alongside their studies legally or illegally? (1 point, 0 comments)
    10. Which metrics do I need, to find out the effects of outward remittance on a poor economy? (1 point, 5 comments)
  8. 52 points, 6 submissions: FrankVillain
    1. Is China still considered a centrally planned economy? (16 points, 4 comments)
    2. Ressources on the Soviet industrial failures due to poor economics? (15 points, 2 comments)
    3. What is the reason behind France's high unemployment rate? (10 points, 13 comments)
    4. About Land Value Tax & Single Tax: how would it affect farmers and those of them who own their land? (9 points, 3 comments)
    5. Does welfare policies contribute to inflation? (2 points, 1 comment)
    6. If a Bitcoin is worth $1 000 000 and some persons like Satoshi have one or more millions of it... what power do they have? Can they disrupt the financial system with the huge amount of dollars that they have? (0 points, 8 comments)
  9. 49 points, 9 submissions: Chumbaka
    1. Can someone explain M0 , M1 and M2 to me? (13 points, 2 comments)
    2. Why is inflation and deflation bad? (13 points, 8 comments)
    3. Can anyone explain why this happens and what it means? (10 points, 3 comments)
    4. Stupid question but : Why does printing lots of money lead to inflation? (5 points, 14 comments)
    5. Why aren't all banks Full Reserve Banking? (5 points, 3 comments)
    6. What does this stock market fall mean to the economy as a whole? (3 points, 4 comments)
    7. How do I pick an economist ideology to support? (0 points, 3 comments)
    8. Is investing in Forex worth it? (0 points, 15 comments)
    9. What is Fractional Reserve Banking? (0 points, 4 comments)
  10. 47 points, 1 submission: furikakebabe
    1. The Tax Bill of 2017 reduced corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%. Tax haven countries have rates as low as 15%. Why would companies be more likely to move money back to the US if they still aren’t getting a better rate? (47 points, 6 comments)
  11. 47 points, 1 submission: gh0bs
    1. Why does the economy have to be a series of bubbles and bursts/corrections, rather than a sustained gradual growth? (47 points, 32 comments)
  12. 45 points, 1 submission: wcoleman22
    1. For all the economists out there that got advanced degrees, what were your most influential assigned readings? (45 points, 23 comments)
  13. 43 points, 1 submission: Crane_Train
    1. How could Venezuela fix its economy? (43 points, 17 comments)
  14. 42 points, 4 submissions: Jollygood156
    1. Why didn't quantitative easing + low interest rates raise inflation high? (20 points, 36 comments)
    2. How do we actually refute MMT? (12 points, 69 comments)
    3. What is Nominal GDP targeting and why do so many people advocate for it? (6 points, 16 comments)
    4. How exactly are land value taxes calculated? (4 points, 3 comments)
  15. 42 points, 1 submission: kornork
    1. With Soybeans piling up and a 12 Billion bailout from the trade war, how come tofu isn’t super cheap right now? (42 points, 3 comments)
  16. 41 points, 1 submission: TheHoleInMoi
    1. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? (41 points, 2 comments)
  17. 39 points, 1 submission: infernomedia
    1. What are some of the most interesting results in economics that are widely well regarded by the academic community to come out in the last decade? (39 points, 7 comments)
  18. 38 points, 1 submission: -reasonable-person-
    1. From an Economic Perspective What is the Most Effective Way for Mexico to end its Violent Organized Crime Problem? (38 points, 13 comments)
  19. 38 points, 1 submission: ajsox22
    1. Does culture impact the growth and development of a nation's economy? (38 points, 15 comments)
  20. 37 points, 8 submissions: MedStudent-96
    1. Quasi-convexity of the Indirect Utility Function? (12 points, 14 comments)
    2. Is my textbook wrong? (9 points, 8 comments)
    3. Interpretation of Lagrange Multipliers for Consumer (5 points, 4 comments)
    4. Consumer Demand Interpretation for Cobb Douglas-Non Convex to Origin. (4 points, 6 comments)
    5. Do monopolies produce the same as a competitive firm in the long run? (4 points, 8 comments)
    6. In some circumstances can a monopoly leave the consumer better off? (1 point, 3 comments)
    7. Two Period Consumption Savings Model (1 point, 3 comments)
    8. [General Equilibrium] Proving that in the limit case the core shrinks to the set of competitive equilibrium. (1 point, 0 comments)

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  20. MedStudent-96 (103 points, 48 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? by benjaminikuta (68 points, 12 comments)
  2. If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises by imadeadinside (65 points, 16 comments)
  3. Why does the economy have to be a series of bubbles and bursts/corrections, rather than a sustained gradual growth? by gh0bs (47 points, 32 comments)
  4. The Tax Bill of 2017 reduced corporate tax rate from 35% to 21%. Tax haven countries have rates as low as 15%. Why would companies be more likely to move money back to the US if they still aren’t getting a better rate? by furikakebabe (47 points, 6 comments)
  5. For all the economists out there that got advanced degrees, what were your most influential assigned readings? by wcoleman22 (45 points, 23 comments)
  6. How could Venezuela fix its economy? by Crane_Train (43 points, 17 comments)
  7. Why do countries like France or Japan have a high debt to GDP but aren't in shambles like Greece? by MrZer (43 points, 16 comments)
  8. Is free public transport a good idea? by Fart_Gas (42 points, 20 comments)
  9. With Soybeans piling up and a 12 Billion bailout from the trade war, how come tofu isn’t super cheap right now? by kornork (42 points, 3 comments)
  10. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? by TheHoleInMoi (41 points, 2 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 68 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  2. 62 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  3. 54 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises
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  6. 47 points: Lucid-Crow's comment in I've heard Marxists claim that central planning is good because the military and corporations do it.
  7. 46 points: Integralds's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  8. 44 points: Yankee9204's comment in If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises
  9. 43 points: lawrencekhoo's comment in With Soybeans piling up and a 12 Billion bailout from the trade war, how come tofu isn’t super cheap right now?
  10. 42 points: Cross_Keynesian's comment in Does income inequality really matter?
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"The Silicon Ideology" Fundamentally fails to understand neoreaction (and basic chronology)

Posted on a throwaway due to the Author's insistence on using Doxxing against their political opponents
May Rule 1a defend me, for I myself hold positions that BadPolitics loves to shit on (No, that position isn't being pro-Neoreaction, for I am firmly anti-Neoreaction)
People of all ideological identities are welcome to post here. Ideologies may be based on wrong facts, but for the purposes of this subreddit, no ideology is wrong by itself. We are here to mock wrong facts, not wrong opinions. As such, posts mocking people for their ideology or political beliefs will be removed.
The Silicon Ideology is an article in Journal format from an unknown author (they used a pseudonym). It is being trumped up as the go-to guide on the emerging political phenomena of Neoreaction. Unfortunately, it suffers from a very severe case of "All my political opponents are the same thing", as Marxist polemics against non-Marxist political theories often do. It's better than a lot of other attempts to analyse Neoreaction because it has the occasional correct observation, but not by much.
I shall skip to part 4 because I don't see much worth in criticizing Neo-Marxist understanding of Fascism separately.
Neo-reaction is a 21st century variant of fascism: a new ideology that values stability, order, efficiency and "good governance" above all, or claims to.
For reasons that will be covered later, it will become clear that trying to lump Neo-reaction in with Fascism doesn't work.
Comprehensive list of the backbone of neo-reactionary values part 1, transhumanism
I wouldn't say it's a backbone, but sure, that's ok.
part 2, form of government
Mostly correct. Eric Schmidt, Elon Musk or Peter Thiel are often given as an example of what a ruler should look like. Given the lack of any political organization beyond blogging, any proposal to actually make one of these a leader isn't serious. I cannot find any indication on the claim that Neo-reactionaries hope to become the aristocrats themselves.
part 3, the Cathedral
I would have listed this first. Doesn't go into enough detail to criticise anything here.
part 4, Nationalism
Misunderstands that Nationalism has to do with Nationality and not Continent of Birth. Misunderstands the conception of why Neoreaction considers (Insert group here) better. See Moldbug's comment on "IQism" here to see the lineage of Neoreaction's apparent preference for certain ethnicities. Like typical racists, Neoreactionaries believe that certain races are more intelligent than others. Unlike typical racists, Neoreactionaries do not believe that intelligence should determine how successful people are. Indeed, Moldbug even argues that our societies have simply replaced overt racism with a subtler racism via discrimination towards the less intelligent (which just so happens to correlate strongly with race according to moldbug). It is from this that Neoreaction's bizarre appearance of East Asian "nationalism" appears. Some Neoreactionaries, despite being of European descent, believe that East Asians are more intelligent.
It may look the same on a cursory glance, but this distinction is, in fact, one of the defining features of Neoreaction, so for the Author to get this wrong is a massive error. Note that I am not saying Neoreaction isn't racist, it's just a different kind of racist.
Part 5, economics
The authors lumping together of the disparate, unrelated Austrian and Chicago economics proves that they understand neither. Austrian and Chicago economics occasionally advocate the same policy (free trade). They disagree on far more. Most importantly, Austrian economists oppose Fiat Money while Chicago economists place extensive focus on governments issuing fiat currency and see it as perhaps the most valuable tool the government has available to it for management of the economy. They are not linked by methodology. Nor are they linked by History: Chicago Economics is a descendant of Keynesian economics.
Once again, a standard case of a Marxist analysis treating all non-Marxists as identical.
Part 6, extreme misogyny
Varies by specific author. To give one example, I see nothing from Moldbug that endorses rape. What little he says on the subject is actually via quotation criticizing liberalism as endorsing rape during wartime. Given this variation, I find it hard to place misogyny to the extent the author describes here as a backbone of Neoreaction. It may well be very strongly present, but "backbone" implies that Neoreaction would cease to be Neoreaction if you removed it.
Part 7, Warhammer 40,000
A bunch of video-game related in-jokes do not a backbone of an ideology make.
Part 8, an obsession with Cuckoldry
Trump Supporters are not Neoreactionaries, but I'll get to that later.
the "academic pole, exemplified in LessWrong
LessWrong is not an academic pole of Neoreaction so much as one of the rare places that will occasionally vaguely tolerate their presence, and hence were the first to critique their ideas. Surveys conducted internally by the community in 2014 put the presence of Neoreactionaries at a mere 1.9%.
and the blogs of the main theorists of the movement
Correct, though I wouldn't call it a movement due to the total lack of political campaigning or advocacy.
And the alt-right pole
Time to win me some downvotes.
Alt-right is a term that has, within a handful of months, been abused and twisted into utter uselessness in an attempt to describe and/or insult Trump. Alt-right is a catch-all term for any non-mainstream Conservatism in the US, typically that which avoids associating with the Republican Party. To describe alt-right as a subset of Neoreaction is grossly incorrect. The truth is that Neoreaction can be seen as a subset of alt-right but the term alt-right in itself is US-Centric and really shouldn't be used to classify political ideologies themselves because it refers generally to non-Republican Conservatism in the US.
To really hammer the point home, the term "Alt Right" predates Neoreaction significantly so unless you're suggesting Moldbug is a mysterious magical time travelling fascist, Alt-Right cannot be a branch of Neoreaction.
neo-reactionary ideas are quite common in Silicon Valley
Without data here it's hard to say what the author means by quite common.
Transhumanism I define to be a collection of movements aimed at improving and enhancing humanity through technological means. Almost immediately, we see a precursor, and one which influenced the previous reactionary ideology of 20th century fascism: eugenics.
This is the most damnable lie in the entire piece.
Eugenics is an ideology that originated in the 19th century, not the 20th. At the latest, Sir Francis Galton coined the term "Eugenics" and described it in 1883, although almost certainly one could find proto-eugenicists prior to 1883.
Hence we come to another case of mysterious magical time travelling fascists. Fascism as an ideology didn't exist in 1883. Even proto-fascism isn't present at such an early date. No, the early adopters of Eugenics weren't Fascists. It was Socialists in the UK. Figures such as Sidney Webb and Beatrice Webb, who founded the Fabian Society, were notable campaigners for Eugenics. This is well documented.
http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/3079/1/Eugenics_(LSERO).pdf
Side note: at this point I've matched the number of citations in the original source.
But let us not tar all transhumanism with eugenics, though it must carry it's historical burden
It's not Transhumanists that need to carry it's burden. They weren't responsible for it's crimes. Those would be actual fascists and Fabians.
though the more homophobic and transphobic element are looking for biological bases for gay-ness and trans-ness to include them here.
I'm sure those scientists researching the mechanisms behind Transgenderism and Homosexuality will be pleased to hear these crass, derogatory comments from the author.
The errors in the section on Transhumanism are even more numerous than presented here, but as it's not the central topic of this article i'm going to move on.
The Historical Origins of Neoreaction
Gamergate
The proportion of Neoreactionaries in Gamergate is minuscule as to be non-existent. Indeed, there's not even enough Neoreactionaries to make up a significant part of Gamergate even if they were all involved in Gamergate.
Thankfully, the author averts accusing Gamergate of time travel here.
Raymond piggybacked off of Stallman's concept of free software to create a version more appealing for corporations: open source.
Unsupported motive assumption.
for here can be seen the origin of the neo-reactionary term "Cathedral" - it is in the title of Raymond's essay "The Cathedral and the Bazaar", though the meaning was somewhat different, referring in Raymond's essay to a centralized model of software development.
"Somewhat Different" is the understatement of a lifetime. Those meanings aren't related at all. It looks like the Author here just searched for someone using the term "Cathedral" in the 90s and chucked in the first mention of it as the source of the term.
The source of the term "Cathedral" is actually made vaguely clear by Moldbug.. It's just a term used to describe the dominant dispenser of information. The original term for the Cathedral is likely Moldbug's Ultracalvinist hypothesis, so to follow that up a year later with a Church metaphor is unsurprising, and is almost certainly a Moldbug original.
The Bell Curve
Controversial? Yes. Flawed? Of course. But to blanket it as a "psuedo-scientific work" is to overstate the criticism here. It's heavily disputed, and to simply paint over that dispute with a "It's wrong" is inaccurate, especially without citation
Evolutionary Psychology
Again, the author slanders a field of research they seem to not know anything about. The author should at least cite something here instead of taking "It's wrong" as a given.
The Economist is Libertarian
No. The Economist is Classical Liberal.
See this comment by PepeLinux. They have classical liberalism as their foundation but refer to themselves as "radical centrists" or "true progressives"
I can speak to this firsthand, as I know many people who do this
Care to cite any? No. Ok.
Dark age of comic books is a source of neo-reaction
This is so stupid as to be barely worth my effort.
The God Emperor of Mankind
Is a meme from a kitschy British Tabletop Wargame community. The Imperium of Man is very consistently shown as an inept, poorly managed chaotic mess of a government that can't even figure out what planets it still owns, hardly a model Neoreactionary system.
Wolfenstein 3D, Doom, Quake and Half-Life
Anyone still taking this work seriously at this point should reconsider their presence on this subreddit. This is "Heavy Metal is actually Satanic" Tier moral panic.
South Park Republican is a precursor to Alt Right.
Guess we are going to have to go further back historically than google trends. This should do. Came to prominence by 1992. South Park began in 1997.
Those damn mysterious magical time travelling fascist south park viewers. Going back in time to 1992 and inventing the Alt-Right.
Orion's Arm is NRx-er's Future Visions
Here the author completely mixes up Rationalists (Eliezer Yudkowsky onwards) and Neoreaction (which makes up a mere 2% of people present in the Rationalist community).
Irrelevant comparison of Pinochet and Patriot Act based on them sharing a date on a calender
Is totally irrelevant.
Bad Philosophy on Positivism, Karl Popper etc
You'd be better visiting /badphilosophy on this one
New Atheists were invented to justify Islamophobia
Anyone with even a cursory understanding of the background of New Atheism would know that their primary target has long been Evangelical Protestantism.
The science wars of the late 90s and Alan Sokal.
Someone's bitter at catastrophically losing the science wars.
Bitcoin and Austrian Economics
True hardcore Austrian Economists would be unfavourable towards bitcoin as it's still a fiat currency. However, I understand (as, hopefully, so does the author) why certain people who gravitate at the fringes of Austrian Economics but don't study it in-depth might like Bitcoin.
Author drops what they're doing to insult Libertarians as not respectable
If this is indeed the quality of work by those who backed the anti-Sokal side of the Science Wars, then no wonder they lost catastrophically.
Author drops what they're doing to insult Ludwig von Mises
sigh... get on with the fucking point.
Chicago School is tied too closely with the crisis.
The dominant Economic school in 2007, and today, is "New Keynesian". Again, demonstrating that the Author here doesn't actually know what they are talking about regarding economics and is just using "Austrian" and "Chicago" as snarl words for "Bad thing".
Author drops what they're doing to shoehorn in the Koch Brothers somewhere
Get on with the fucking point.
Sudden jump to Curtis Yarvin mid-paragraph on LessWrong
Needless to say, this betrays how weak the link between these subjects is.
though he [Mencius Moldbug] did not call himself, initially, "neo-reactionary": he preferred to call himself a "Formalist" or a "Neocameralist" (after his hero, Frederick the Great).
Correct, but this isn't exactly worthy of congratulations.
Later in the speech, Srinivasan went through the whole gamut of neo-reactionary ideas: Bitcoin, corporate city-states, 3d-printed firearms, anti-democratic transhumanism.
All of these ideas predate Neo-Reaction. Nor are these ideas limited to Neo-reaction. I These fucking mysterious magical time travelling fascists.
Neo-reaction grew immensely outside of it's Bay Area base in the wake of the financial crisis
We have no data on the number of supporters of Neo-reaction. However, we do have some data on how much people were searching for it online. The conclusion is...
Neoreaction didn't even show up on the radar until 2013, and immense growth in interest in the movement only occurred once inept journalists started scrambling around for an explanation of Trump's rise to prominence.
Right-wing media blamed teachers and immigrants [for the financial crisis]
No. It did not blame teachers for the financial crisis.
Liberal Claptrap Nonsense
Again betraying the distinctly unprofessional, unacademic nature of this work.
Lets wave around our hate boner for the IMF
Great, but can you get on with the fucking point again?
Origins of 4chan
The author probably should have mentioned that 4chan was effectively a split from SomethingAwful, something which I feel is essential for any description of 4chan's early history.
surrounding racism, misogyny, homophobia, and transphobia was the centrepiece of the culture.
Go tell that they're homophobic. They will have a laugh.
and so the userbase quickly became limited to young white cis straight men
Go tell that they're cis straight men. They will have a laugh.
Stormfront took over 4chan.
This is indeed vaguely correct, but it underestimates just how underhanded this takeover was. It was not a natural migration. Stormfront had long made deliberate effort to infiltrate various communities (including 4chan) with it's ideas. The most obvious calling card for a Stormfront attempt to infiltrate something is the phrase "Anti-Racist is code for Anti-White".
Harassment tactics originated on USENET
Actually, these Harassment tactics originated on SomethingAwful, which is how 4chan ended up inheriting them.
women, people of colour, and LGBT people always had played games.
Indeed, this shouldn't even need to be stated. A good example of a prominent early LGBT developer would be Danielle Bunten Berry.
Gamergaters are annoyed at games not about war or technology
No. This is not the kind of game that Gamergaters got annoyed about. If they did get annoyed about any specific kind of game, it was Advocacy Games and the genre known as "Interactive Narrative Experiences" or something to that effect, or more colloquially called "Walking simulators".
Called for serious critique and then called against serious critique
Critique of Critique is legitimate Critique.
Precedents of Gamergate
They missed out Doritosgate.
Fish disappeared from the internet.
The disappearance of Phil Fish is a bit more complicated than "Gamergate did it" and it mostly happened in 2013 after telling someone to kill themselves. Them mysterious magical time travelling fascist gamergaters!
Indeed this entire section appears to be severely out of chronological order but I'm just going to move on because i've already covered how almost entirely irrelevant Gamergate is to NRx.
LGBT people in gamergate don't exist and are all sockpuppets.
You're currently reading a text written by a bisexual individual who is vaguely, slightly pro-gamergate. This author is alleging that I don't exist. Talk about bisexual erasure.
Soon, the neo-reactionaries noticed, and affiliated themselves with GamerGate:...
Here we get a list of individuals that the Author believes are Neoreactionaries.
Vox Day indeed appears to be a neo-reactionary, although this is seemingly only a recent occurrence.
antinrx: Finding sources so lazy authors don't have to.
Roosh V really doesn't think highly of Neoreaction, calling it "a dumping ground for high IQ guys who don't get laid"
Davis Aurini is indeed a Neoreactionary.
I can't even find anything by Thunderfoot on Neoreaction. It looks like claims he's a Neoreactionary are just regurgitated from attack articles on him.
Sargon of Akkad has engaged with Neoreactionaries, and wasn't favorable to them at all. Indeed, Neoreactionary sources have criticized Sargon of Akkad's criticism of Neoreaction. Sargon of Akkad's criticism is really weak, but it's clear enough that he's not Neoreactionary, even if he can't quite figure out why.
Janet Bloomfield again only has attack articles claiming she's a neoreactionary, she has not stated anything on it herself.
Karen Straughan criticizes Feminism from a Libertarian Perspective, and I find no good indication that she's a neoreactionary.
Mike Cernovich expresses distaste for neoreaction.
The closest thing to Milo on Neoreaction is his "sidekick" Allum Bokhari trying to describe Neoreaction to Breitbart readers.
This isn't an exhaustive search by any means, but this isn't my job to demonstrate. Citations, where are they?
They began to pressure advertisers and Wikipedia, among others, and attempted to hijack the Hugo Awards through the Sad/Rabid Puppies campaign
Sad puppies doesn't come from Gamergate. This can be demonstrated simply by looking at the date of formation of the Sad Puppies voting campaign. It was formed in January 2013, while Gamergate begun in 2014. Those evil mysterious magical time travelling fascist goobergaters!
When his [moldbug's] past was brought up by concerned people of colour
Which incidentally gave Neoreaction the largest dose of adrenaline it has ever received and, unfortunately, staved off it's passage into obscurity and total irrelevance (instead of just being almost totally irrelevant).
"sometimes I think Mencius Moldbug is the greatest living political thinker".
Strangely, not too far out there. His ideas may be absolutely abominable, but who else in the 21st century can claim to have almost single-handedly founded a new political ideology: Not many. "Great" should be taken as "Influential", not "Good".
The alt right converted Tay into a Nazi.
Given the Black-box nature of Tay's programming and learning systems, it's not actually possible to verify any of this.
Schizoanalyst (or a Psychoanalyst)
Given the author's prior criticism of Psuedoscience, it seems comical to bring up Psychoanalysis here.
In order to contain the alt-right, we must stop this.
The first step to stopping the alt-right is good criticism of the alt-right. Same with Neo-reaction. Unfortunately, this isn't it.
Praxis
Fascism can't be defeated by debate
Fascism was significantly removed from post-War Germany not because all the Nazis were dead, but because of the process of Denazification, which indeed used debate techniques such as emphisizing the moral responsibility that low-level Nazi supporters (such as your average voter) had for the crime. Stuff like this (warning corpses). Fascism wasn't defeated by rounding up everyone who ever supported Hitler and gunning them down (or beating the shit out of them). Indeed, to stoop to the level of political para-militarism to defeat fascism is to accept fascism itself, for political intimidation and "cleansing" of the opposition through para-militarism is essentially Fascism's defining feature.
Lets doxx all the Neoreactionaries.
There's that "Fight paramilitarism with paramilitarism" tactic I just mentioned. Oh dear. How predictable.
Repeated errors that aren't from a specific passage
Treating 4chan as a monolithic culture is idiocy. Postings on about cute girls doing cute girls has little to do with Neoreaction, to give the most obvious example.
Actually, that makes me curious as to what the Neoreactionary position on non-progressive-originating acceptance of Homosexuality (such as the Yuri Genre) is.
Also, as this very sub is on reddit, it should be quite obvious that reddit isn't monolithically Neoreactionary. Indeed, neoreaction presence on Reddit is almost entirely non-existent. Seriously, go look for their core subs. They are basically graveyards.
Mixing up Gamergaters, Trump Supporters, Alt-Right, Neoreactionaries, Libertarians, Transhumanists and Social Conservatives, Austrian Economists, Chicago School and Anarcho-Capitalists (unmentioned) occurs throughout. The author appears to be unable to conceive of any of their opponents actually holding different views from each-other and just throws them all into the same pot, wildly swinging from term to term with such wild abandon that by the end the terms are reduced to vague insults instead of useful definitions.
Neoreaction is shit. Bad criticism of Neoreaction only makes it stronger
Like Neoreactionary blogging itself, this article consists of a mix of largely gibberish, with only the occasional factoid managing to glitter through the incoherent gish gallop muck surrounding it. It can't even get basic chronology correct, making repeated errors where it states groups were created by groups that were founded later than their own founding.
The best counter to Neoreaction remains this article written by a member of the LessWrong Diasporia (yes, that same LessWrong that the author slandered as being Neoreactionary). By being willing to engage with them, they've already done your work of discrediting Neoreaction for you.
submitted by antinrx to badpolitics [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: AskEconomics posts from 2018-08-22 to 2018-11-12 07:20 PDT

Period: 82.02 days
Submissions Comments
Total 979 6319
Rate (per day) 11.94 76.69
Unique Redditors 688 1060
Combined Score 5907 19076

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 322 points, 37 submissions: benjaminikuta
    1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? (71 points, 12 comments)
    2. The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be? (64 points, 24 comments)
    3. Do powerful unions increase wages above the optimal level, or do firms with market power cause imperfect competition in the labor market, causing sub optimal wages? (Or both?) (27 points, 3 comments)
    4. How do economists measure unpaid work? (24 points, 8 comments)
    5. When it is said that someone in a third world country lives on a dollar a day, what does that actually mean? (22 points, 19 comments)
    6. What are some common misconceptions about economics? (14 points, 19 comments)
    7. What would be a better alternative to Bernie's proposal to tax employers of welfare recipients? (14 points, 65 comments)
    8. How effectively can negative externalities be quantified? (10 points, 7 comments)
    9. To what degree has the internet increased the liquidity of the labor market? (7 points, 3 comments)
    10. What happened with the Greek economic crisis? (7 points, 5 comments)
  2. 146 points, 30 submissions: Whynvme
    1. When economists refer to industrialization, does it mean a move from agricultural to manufacturing economy? Is the growth in services a different term? (22 points, 6 comments)
    2. Do economists actually calculate consumer surplus empirically, or is it more of s theoretical concept? (20 points, 5 comments)
    3. If we have cobb douglas preferences, my demand for x is not a function of the price of y. How do substitution effects arise then? (11 points, 6 comments)
    4. Is me making more money than I would necessarily require to work( so more than my 'opportunity wage') for a job an economic inefficiency? or is ineffiency in labor markets a wedge between my marginal revenue product and my wage? (11 points, 3 comments)
    5. why is ceteris paribus important for analyzing/thinking about the world? (11 points, 7 comments)
    6. Why does inflation necessarily mean wages will be increasing too? (6 points, 3 comments)
    7. some basic macro questions (6 points, 2 comments)
    8. what is meant by value added? (6 points, 3 comments)
    9. Trying to understand economies of scale, e.g. costco (5 points, 5 comments)
    10. Why would an economy implode long term if there are decreasing returns to scale? (5 points, 15 comments)
  3. 95 points, 2 submissions: MrDannyOcean
    1. Announcing a new policy direction for /AskEconomics (75 points, 135 comments)
    2. The new rules for AskEconomics are now in place. Please see the details within. (20 points, 20 comments)
  4. 79 points, 7 submissions: Fart_Gas
    1. Is free public transport a good idea? (41 points, 20 comments)
    2. Will Venezuela's plummeting economy make it a good choice for low-wage industries? (17 points, 8 comments)
    3. What might cause sudden inflation? (8 points, 2 comments)
    4. Why do some countries without hyperinflation use a foreign currency in everyday life? (8 points, 3 comments)
    5. Has any country tried reducing the minimum wage, and ended up with a good result from it? (3 points, 8 comments)
    6. Do boycotts really work? (1 point, 3 comments)
    7. Why do some businesses sponsor sporting teams in countries they don't operate in, and that they don't plan to expand to in the foreseeable future? (1 point, 1 comment)
  5. 66 points, 7 submissions: FrankVillain
    1. Can the Euro become the global currency for trade? (17 points, 3 comments)
    2. Is China still considered a centrally planned economy? (16 points, 4 comments)
    3. Ressources on the Soviet industrial failures due to poor economics? (14 points, 2 comments)
    4. What is the reason behind France's high unemployment rate? (9 points, 14 comments)
    5. About Land Value Tax & Single Tax: how would it affect farmers and those of them who own their land? (7 points, 3 comments)
    6. Does welfare policies contribute to inflation? (2 points, 1 comment)
    7. If a Bitcoin is worth $1 000 000 and some persons like Satoshi have one or more millions of it... what power do they have? Can they disrupt the financial system with the huge amount of dollars that they have? (1 point, 8 comments)
  6. 66 points, 1 submission: imadeadinside
    1. If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises (66 points, 16 comments)
  7. 64 points, 6 submissions: Serpenthrope
    1. Have there been any serious proposals for economic systems that don't use money? (23 points, 67 comments)
    2. Could a company ever become quality-control for a market in which they're competing, assuming no government interference? (16 points, 4 comments)
    3. Is there a formal name for this? (15 points, 6 comments)
    4. Why are second-hand clothing donations fundamentally different from other types of imports? (5 points, 1 comment)
    5. I saw this article on a UN report calling for the dismantling of Capitalism to stop Global Warming, and was wondering what most economists think of the claims? (3 points, 4 comments)
    6. Peter Navarro and Lyndon Larouche? (2 points, 1 comment)
  8. 62 points, 2 submissions: JeffGotSwags
    1. What are the most commonly held misconceptions about economics among people with at least some background? (36 points, 38 comments)
    2. How did the financial crisis affect the demand for economists? (26 points, 5 comments)
  9. 61 points, 11 submissions: Chumbaka
    1. Can someone explain M0 , M1 and M2 to me? (13 points, 2 comments)
    2. Can anyone explain why this happens and what it means? (11 points, 3 comments)
    3. Can a monopoly also be a monopsony? (10 points, 13 comments)
    4. Why is inflation and deflation bad? (10 points, 8 comments)
    5. Stupid question but : Why does printing lots of money lead to inflation? (5 points, 14 comments)
    6. Why aren't all banks Full Reserve Banking? (5 points, 3 comments)
    7. What does this stock market fall mean to the economy as a whole? (4 points, 4 comments)
    8. How would an universal free market deal with situations like NK? (3 points, 21 comments)
    9. How do I pick an economist ideology to support? (0 points, 3 comments)
    10. Is investing in Forex worth it? (0 points, 15 comments)
  10. 60 points, 6 submissions: Jollygood156
    1. Why didn't quantitative easing + low interest rates raise inflation high? (20 points, 36 comments)
    2. How do we actually refute MMT? (14 points, 68 comments)
    3. Tax Cuts boost Consumption, but the growth is short term while investments are long term. Why? (12 points, 7 comments)
    4. How exactly are land value taxes calculated? (6 points, 3 comments)
    5. What is Nominal GDP targeting and why do so many people advocate for it? (5 points, 16 comments)
    6. What even is Austerity? (3 points, 3 comments)
  11. 49 points, 1 submission: Akehc99
    1. Those who went into the job market after an Econ Undergrad, what do you do and briefly what does it entail? (49 points, 27 comments)
  12. 48 points, 1 submission: Traveledfarwestward
    1. What do most Economists think about The Economist? (48 points, 26 comments)
  13. 48 points, 1 submission: piltonpfizerwallace
    1. What would happen if the US printed $12.3 trillion tomorrow and paid off all of its debt? (48 points, 31 comments)
  14. 47 points, 6 submissions: lalze123
    1. Will Bernie's "STOP BEZOS" plan lower the opportunity cost of hiring non-poor workers, thereby harming poor workers? (19 points, 15 comments)
    2. What does the current economic literature say about the effects of net neutrality? (14 points, 0 comments)
    3. What government programs have been empirically proven to help displaced workers from import competition? (8 points, 0 comments)
    4. By how much does lowering the budget deficit lower the trade deficit? (5 points, 4 comments)
    5. What are some good studies analyzing the difference in efficiency between markets and central planning? (1 point, 1 comment)
    6. Is the study below reliable? (0 points, 3 comments)
  15. 45 points, 1 submission: gh0bs
    1. Why does the economy have to be a series of bubbles and bursts/corrections, rather than a sustained gradual growth? (45 points, 32 comments)
  16. 42 points, 1 submission: Turnt_Up_For_What
    1. You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy? (42 points, 24 comments)
  17. 41 points, 1 submission: Crane_Train
    1. How could Venezuela fix its economy? (41 points, 19 comments)
  18. 41 points, 1 submission: TheHoleInMoi
    1. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? (41 points, 2 comments)
  19. 39 points, 5 submissions: UyhAEqbnp
    1. Does income inequality really matter? (19 points, 39 comments)
    2. What happens when there's a surplus of labour? Can there ever be a point where the wages earned are less than the cost of living? (10 points, 2 comments)
    3. Several questions (4 points, 4 comments)
    4. "Keeping seniors from retiring does not boost wages via aggregate demand" (3 points, 5 comments)
    5. Is Okun's Law valid? (3 points, 3 comments)
  20. 39 points, 4 submissions: justinVOLuntary
    1. Best resource on the financial crisis of 2008 (17 points, 7 comments)
    2. Blogs? (11 points, 5 comments)
    3. Econ Internship (7 points, 5 comments)
    4. Not sure if this is the kind of question I should be asking here. I’m an Undergrad Econ major and I’m looking for reading recommendations. Anything from economic theory, history, current research, etc. Main interest is Macro. Thanks (4 points, 5 comments)
  21. 39 points, 2 submissions: ConditionalDew
    1. How much would the iPhone be if it was made in the US? (37 points, 15 comments)
    2. Who are some famous people/celebrities that were economics majors? (2 points, 2 comments)
  22. 39 points, 1 submission: rangerlinks
    1. Who are the best economist to follow on Twitter? (39 points, 16 comments)
  23. 36 points, 5 submissions: CanadianAsshole1
    1. If free trade is so good, then why do countries insist on making trade deals? Why can't we just abolish all tariffs? (18 points, 11 comments)
    2. If climate change is such a huge problem, then why aren't countries utilizing nuclear energy more? (8 points, 17 comments)
    3. Do I understand the problem with"trickle-down" economics correctly? (6 points, 38 comments)
    4. How much of the Reagan administration's deficits could be attributed to increased defense spending? (3 points, 3 comments)
    5. If automation will result in less jobs, then shouldn't the government stop incentivizing childbirth through tax credits and stop immigration? (1 point, 12 comments)
  24. 35 points, 7 submissions: MedStudent-96
    1. Is my textbook wrong? (11 points, 8 comments)
    2. Quasi-convexity of the Indirect Utility Function? (9 points, 14 comments)
    3. Consumer Demand Interpretation for Cobb Douglas-Non Convex to Origin. (4 points, 6 comments)
    4. Do monopolies produce the same as a competitive firm in the long run? (4 points, 8 comments)
    5. Interpretation of Lagrange Multipliers for Consumer (4 points, 4 comments)
    6. Optimisation when MRTS > price ratio (2 points, 7 comments)
    7. Help with the Partial Derivative of the Marginal Cost Function. (1 point, 10 comments)
  25. 35 points, 1 submission: grate1438
    1. Why do Croatians receieve so much more through their pension than their working wage? (35 points, 8 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. BainCapitalist (2626 points, 648 comments)
  2. Calvo_fairy (947 points, 232 comments)
  3. smalleconomist (885 points, 255 comments)
  4. RobThorpe (776 points, 259 comments)
  5. zzzzz94 (577 points, 111 comments)
  6. Cross_Keynesian (520 points, 108 comments)
  7. Integralds (418 points, 68 comments)
  8. penguin_rider222 (395 points, 116 comments)
  9. whyrat (362 points, 69 comments)
  10. bbqroast (319 points, 74 comments)
  11. MrDannyOcean (314 points, 54 comments)
  12. isntanywhere (207 points, 63 comments)
  13. RedditUser91805 (189 points, 28 comments)
  14. CapitalismAndFreedom (176 points, 68 comments)
  15. benjaminikuta (171 points, 112 comments)
  16. LucasCritique (162 points, 33 comments)
  17. raptorman556 (157 points, 44 comments)
  18. lawrencekhoo (156 points, 22 comments)
  19. daokedao4 (131 points, 16 comments)
  20. Yankee9204 (121 points, 15 comments)
  21. roboczar (112 points, 20 comments)
  22. RegulatoryCapture (109 points, 23 comments)
  23. ecolonomist (105 points, 45 comments)
  24. TheoryOfSomething (102 points, 9 comments)
  25. Forgot_the_Jacobian (97 points, 31 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. Announcing a new policy direction for /AskEconomics by MrDannyOcean (75 points, 135 comments)
  2. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? by benjaminikuta (71 points, 12 comments)
  3. If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises by imadeadinside (66 points, 16 comments)
  4. The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be? by benjaminikuta (64 points, 24 comments)
  5. Those who went into the job market after an Econ Undergrad, what do you do and briefly what does it entail? by Akehc99 (49 points, 27 comments)
  6. What would happen if the US printed $12.3 trillion tomorrow and paid off all of its debt? by piltonpfizerwallace (48 points, 31 comments)
  7. What do most Economists think about The Economist? by Traveledfarwestward (48 points, 26 comments)
  8. Why does the economy have to be a series of bubbles and bursts/corrections, rather than a sustained gradual growth? by gh0bs (45 points, 32 comments)
  9. What is the difference in knowledge between academic economists(Krugman, Acemoglu, Mankiw etc) and hedge fund managers and the like(Soros, James Simons)? by deleted (43 points, 5 comments)
  10. You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy? by Turnt_Up_For_What (42 points, 24 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 62 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  2. 62 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Milton Friedman is well respected by many economists, why aren't there more Libertarians?
  3. 59 points: RedditUser91805's comment in The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be?
  4. 58 points: arctigos's comment in What do most Economists think about The Economist?
  5. 55 points: hbtn's comment in Why are Little Caesar's cheese pizzas the same price as its pepperoni pizzas?
  6. 54 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Could someone explain the wage gap and whether it's a myth or not.
  7. 51 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in If Bruce Wayne was revealed as Batman, would stock prices and sales skyrocket or plummet for Wayne Enterprises
  8. 51 points: RedditUser91805's comment in You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy?
  9. 51 points: smalleconomist's comment in What are the most commonly held misconceptions about economics among people with at least some background?
  10. 49 points: TheoryOfSomething's comment in Which parts of Marxism are theoretically dependent on the labor theory of value and which are not?
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: AskEconomics posts from 2018-07-29 to 2018-10-19 16:52 PDT

Period: 82.20 days
Submissions Comments
Total 984 6990
Rate (per day) 11.97 84.00
Unique Redditors 705 1188
Combined Score 5816 20552

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 240 points, 28 submissions: benjaminikuta
    1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? (69 points, 12 comments)
    2. The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be? (61 points, 24 comments)
    3. What would be a better alternative to Bernie's proposal to tax employers of welfare recipients? (15 points, 68 comments)
    4. What's happening right now with the agriculture industry in South Africa? (15 points, 3 comments)
    5. To what degree is planned obsolescence due to consumer behavior, rather than the other way around? (12 points, 1 comment)
    6. Why do changes in bitcoin price and mining difficulty not have a greater effect on the amount of mining being done? (8 points, 7 comments)
    7. How effectively can negative externalities be quantified? (7 points, 7 comments)
    8. What exactly is "Capitalism" anyway? (7 points, 17 comments)
    9. Are open source projects, such as VLC, subject to market forces? (6 points, 7 comments)
    10. What happened to the agricultural industry in South Africa? (6 points, 0 comments)
  2. 168 points, 37 submissions: Whynvme
    1. When economists refer to industrialization, does it mean a move from agricultural to manufacturing economy? Is the growth in services a different term? (24 points, 6 comments)
    2. Do economists actually calculate consumer surplus empirically, or is it more of s theoretical concept? (19 points, 5 comments)
    3. Does employees of a company with a relatively inelastic demand have an incentive not to care too much? (13 points, 9 comments)
    4. why is ceteris paribus important for analyzing/thinking about the world? (12 points, 7 comments)
    5. Is me making more money than I would necessarily require to work( so more than my 'opportunity wage') for a job an economic inefficiency? or is ineffiency in labor markets a wedge between my marginal revenue product and my wage? (11 points, 3 comments)
    6. With a land value tax, since the supply of land is perfectly inelastic(or less elastic than demand), would theory suggest land owners will pay most of the tax? (10 points, 4 comments)
    7. Are policies such as the gov creating jobs that arent necessary(like gas station attendants) an example of the Broken window fallacy? (7 points, 7 comments)
    8. what is meant by value added? (7 points, 3 comments)
    9. Question about planned economies without price mechanism and forced labor (5 points, 2 comments)
    10. Why does inflation necessarily mean wages will be increasing too? (5 points, 3 comments)
  3. 116 points, 10 submissions: pattersonisagamer
    1. Why do economists believe rent control policies harm the poor instead of carrying out the intent and helping them out greatly? (49 points, 26 comments)
    2. Under Sen Sanders (I-VT) single payer healthcare system he guarantees the average family would pay $466/year on healthcare. Is this true/possible? Would you favor this policy? (27 points, 46 comments)
    3. What is a good type of internship for an undergrad summer going into senior year? (11 points, 6 comments)
    4. What would the economic effect be if the United States removed its $7.25/hr minimum wage? Would you support this? Why/why not? (10 points, 21 comments)
    5. How can you tell if someone's preferences are convex? (7 points, 11 comments)
    6. What is quantitative easing and how does it differ from normal actions taken by the Fed? (4 points, 19 comments)
    7. Is it true that you can make decent money out of college as an independent financial advisor with a BS in Economics/other independent, self employed jobs? (3 points, 6 comments)
    8. What exactly is a negative income tax? Would you support implementing this policy? (3 points, 8 comments)
    9. Carbon tax in the USA? (2 points, 2 comments)
    10. Should we have a central bank? (0 points, 3 comments)
  4. 92 points, 9 submissions: Fart_Gas
    1. Is free public transport a good idea? (44 points, 23 comments)
    2. Will Venezuela's plummeting economy make it a good choice for low-wage industries? (18 points, 8 comments)
    3. Why do some countries without hyperinflation use a foreign currency in everyday life? (10 points, 3 comments)
    4. What might cause sudden inflation? (7 points, 2 comments)
    5. Has any country tried reducing the minimum wage, and ended up with a good result from it? (4 points, 9 comments)
    6. How could ranchers and meat-dependent countries adjust to a world that is switching away from meat due to environmental and health concerns? (3 points, 7 comments)
    7. What is the cause of Taiwan's economic failure? (3 points, 1 comment)
    8. How come rationing in the UK during World War II went rather smoothly? (2 points, 4 comments)
    9. Do boycotts really work? (1 point, 3 comments)
  5. 84 points, 8 submissions: Serpenthrope
    1. Have there been any serious proposals for economic systems that don't use money? (24 points, 67 comments)
    2. Pockets in women's clothing (18 points, 30 comments)
    3. Is there a formal name for this? (16 points, 6 comments)
    4. Could a company ever become quality-control for a market in which they're competing, assuming no government interference? (15 points, 4 comments)
    5. I saw this article on a UN report calling for the dismantling of Capitalism to stop Global Warming, and was wondering what most economists think of the claims? (3 points, 4 comments)
    6. What would the economic impact be if the Extended Family returns? (3 points, 3 comments)
    7. Why are second-hand clothing donations fundamentally different from other types of imports? (3 points, 1 comment)
    8. Peter Navarro and Lyndon Larouche? (2 points, 1 comment)
  6. 80 points, 2 submissions: MrDannyOcean
    1. Announcing a new policy direction for /AskEconomics (68 points, 135 comments)
    2. The new rules for AskEconomics are now in place. Please see the details within. (12 points, 17 comments)
  7. 58 points, 8 submissions: Jollygood156
    1. Why didn't quantitative easing + low interest rates raise inflation high? (20 points, 36 comments)
    2. How do we actually refute MMT? (11 points, 68 comments)
    3. Tax Cuts boost Consumption, but the growth is short term while investments are long term. Why? (11 points, 7 comments)
    4. What is Nominal GDP targeting and why do so many people advocate for it? (6 points, 16 comments)
    5. How exactly are land value taxes calculated? (5 points, 3 comments)
    6. What even is Austerity? (3 points, 3 comments)
    7. During the time of economic upswing is it good to look to balance the budget or run a surplus? (1 point, 7 comments)
    8. How do we know that money is neutral in the longrun? (1 point, 22 comments)
  8. 52 points, 11 submissions: lalze123
    1. Will Bernie's "STOP BEZOS" plan lower the opportunity cost of hiring non-poor workers, thereby harming poor workers? (19 points, 15 comments)
    2. What does the current economic literature say about the effects of net neutrality? (12 points, 0 comments)
    3. What government programs have been empirically proven to help displaced workers from import competition? (5 points, 0 comments)
    4. By how much does lowering the budget deficit lower the trade deficit? (4 points, 4 comments)
    5. How much revenue would a negative income tax require? (3 points, 3 comments)
    6. How would replacing the minimum wage with a negative income tax turn out? (3 points, 4 comments)
    7. Is it possible for advertisements to have signaling effects that are detrimental? (3 points, 3 comments)
    8. Can you have a negative income tax system without inherent tax mechanisms? (1 point, 1 comment)
    9. What are some good studies analyzing the difference in efficiency between markets and central planning? (1 point, 1 comment)
    10. Would economists prefer bilateral/multilateral free trade agreements or unilateral free trade? (1 point, 4 comments)
  9. 48 points, 6 submissions: CanadianAsshole1
    1. If free trade is so good, then why do countries insist on making trade deals? Why can't we just abolish all tariffs? (17 points, 11 comments)
    2. Does the wage gap still exist after controlling for factors like education, career choice, and hours worked (13 points, 39 comments)
    3. Do I understand the problem with"trickle-down" economics correctly? (8 points, 38 comments)
    4. If climate change is such a huge problem, then why aren't countries utilizing nuclear energy more? (6 points, 17 comments)
    5. How much of the Reagan administration's deficits could be attributed to increased defense spending? (3 points, 3 comments)
    6. If automation will result in less jobs, then shouldn't the government stop incentivizing childbirth through tax credits and stop immigration? (1 point, 12 comments)
  10. 48 points, 1 submission: Traveledfarwestward
    1. What do most Economists think about The Economist? (48 points, 26 comments)
  11. 46 points, 8 submissions: Chumbaka
    1. Why is inflation and deflation bad? (12 points, 8 comments)
    2. Can a monopoly also be a monopsony? (10 points, 13 comments)
    3. Can anyone explain why this happens and what it means? (10 points, 3 comments)
    4. Stupid question but : Why does printing lots of money lead to inflation? (5 points, 14 comments)
    5. What do you think of Khan's Academy Economy lessons? (4 points, 2 comments)
    6. What does this stock market fall mean to the economy as a whole? (4 points, 4 comments)
    7. How would an universal free market deal with situations like NK? (1 point, 21 comments)
    8. How do I pick an economist ideology to support? (0 points, 3 comments)
  12. 46 points, 2 submissions: prman222
    1. What is the difference in knowledge between academic economists(Krugman, Acemoglu, Mankiw etc) and hedge fund managers and the like(Soros, James Simons)? (44 points, 5 comments)
    2. is a recession likely to come by 2020? (2 points, 11 comments)
  13. 46 points, 1 submission: TheHoleInMoi
    1. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? (46 points, 2 comments)
  14. 44 points, 1 submission: Akehc99
    1. Those who went into the job market after an Econ Undergrad, what do you do and briefly what does it entail? (44 points, 27 comments)
  15. 44 points, 1 submission: piltonpfizerwallace
    1. What would happen if the US printed $12.3 trillion tomorrow and paid off all of its debt? (44 points, 30 comments)
  16. 43 points, 2 submissions: ConditionalDew
    1. How much would the iPhone be if it was made in the US? (41 points, 15 comments)
    2. Who are some famous people/celebrities that were economics majors? (2 points, 2 comments)
  17. 42 points, 1 submission: Turnt_Up_For_What
    1. You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy? (42 points, 24 comments)
  18. 42 points, 1 submission: rangerlinks
    1. Who are the best economist to follow on Twitter? (42 points, 16 comments)
  19. 41 points, 5 submissions: TeaRev1ew
    1. Is there any basis to the theoretic economics of Anarchism? Could such a system work outside of coffee shops/other low level enterprises? (15 points, 18 comments)
    2. Are sovereign wealth funds a new phenomenon? (12 points, 1 comment)
    3. How do state funded enterprises lead to corruption? Is there a difference between developed and developing nations (or a patron-client relationship)? (6 points, 11 comments)
    4. How does releasing a new currency curb inflation in the era of fiat? (5 points, 5 comments)
    5. How do companies do business in states where their government doesn't recognize the sovereign entity? (3 points, 1 comment)
  20. 36 points, 1 submission: JeffGotSwags
    1. What are the most commonly held misconceptions about economics among people with at least some background? (36 points, 34 comments)

Top Commenters

  1. BainCapitalist (2631 points, 654 comments)
  2. RobThorpe (864 points, 280 comments)
  3. zzzzz94 (719 points, 147 comments)
  4. Calvo_fairy (715 points, 198 comments)
  5. smalleconomist (605 points, 179 comments)
  6. Cross_Keynesian (489 points, 94 comments)
  7. bbqroast (458 points, 103 comments)
  8. penguin_rider222 (428 points, 128 comments)
  9. riggorous (330 points, 115 comments)
  10. Integralds (326 points, 65 comments)
  11. whyrat (314 points, 68 comments)
  12. MrDannyOcean (248 points, 42 comments)
  13. isntanywhere (201 points, 64 comments)
  14. RedditUser91805 (179 points, 30 comments)
  15. emeraldcity27 (161 points, 8 comments)
  16. CapitalismAndFreedom (143 points, 66 comments)
  17. raptorman556 (142 points, 34 comments)
  18. LucasCritique (132 points, 30 comments)
  19. lawrencekhoo (129 points, 19 comments)
  20. roboczar (120 points, 21 comments)

Top Submissions

  1. So, what's the difference between this new trade deal with Mexico and Canada and the old one, and what are the implications? by benjaminikuta (69 points, 12 comments)
  2. Announcing a new policy direction for /AskEconomics by MrDannyOcean (68 points, 135 comments)
  3. The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be? by benjaminikuta (61 points, 24 comments)
  4. Why do economists believe rent control policies harm the poor instead of carrying out the intent and helping them out greatly? by pattersonisagamer (49 points, 26 comments)
  5. What do most Economists think about The Economist? by Traveledfarwestward (48 points, 26 comments)
  6. Are there any papers/solid arguments about the benefits of having more local business as opposed to corporate consolidation? by TheHoleInMoi (46 points, 2 comments)
  7. What would happen if the US printed $12.3 trillion tomorrow and paid off all of its debt? by piltonpfizerwallace (44 points, 30 comments)
  8. Those who went into the job market after an Econ Undergrad, what do you do and briefly what does it entail? by Akehc99 (44 points, 27 comments)
  9. Is free public transport a good idea? by Fart_Gas (44 points, 23 comments)
  10. What is the difference in knowledge between academic economists(Krugman, Acemoglu, Mankiw etc) and hedge fund managers and the like(Soros, James Simons)? by prman222 (44 points, 5 comments)

Top Comments

  1. 124 points: emeraldcity27's comment in Why do economists believe rent control policies harm the poor instead of carrying out the intent and helping them out greatly?
  2. 74 points: BainCapitalist's comment in What would happen if the US corporate income tax was abolished?
  3. 56 points: Calvo_fairy's comment in Could someone explain the wage gap and whether it's a myth or not.
  4. 56 points: RedditUser91805's comment in The EU is considering making product life expectancy a mandatory piece of info for consumer electronics. What would the economic implications of that be?
  5. 55 points: TheBellmanHimself's comment in Why is the Soviet Union generally considered to be a "failure"?
  6. 55 points: hbtn's comment in Why are Little Caesar's cheese pizzas the same price as its pepperoni pizzas?
  7. 54 points: arctigos's comment in What do most Economists think about The Economist?
  8. 49 points: sethg's comment in Why do economists believe rent control policies harm the poor instead of carrying out the intent and helping them out greatly?
  9. 47 points: RedditUser91805's comment in You've just been declared supreme potentate of Venezuela. Now how do you fix the economy?
  10. 47 points: smalleconomist's comment in What are the most commonly held misconceptions about economics among people with at least some background?
Generated with BBoe's Subreddit Stats
submitted by subreddit_stats to subreddit_stats [link] [comments]

Subreddit Stats: CanadaPolitics posts from 2017-11-17 to 2017-12-14 21:55 PDT

Period: 26.92 days
Submissions Comments
Total 941 21286
Rate (per day) 34.95 762.33
Unique Redditors 266 2329
Combined Score 32739 150061

Top Submitters' Top Submissions

  1. 3428 points, 60 submissions: _Minor_Annoyance
    1. Poll suggests majority of Canadians backs outright ban on guns in urban areas (395 points, 1213 comments)
    2. Ottawa to build 100,000 new affordable units, recognize housing as 'fundamental right ' (345 points, 113 comments)
    3. Justin Trudeau Is ‘Very Concerned’ With FCC’s Plan to Roll Back Net Neutrality (294 points, 79 comments)
    4. Harper Government Identified ‘Mental Health Issues’ as a Root Cause of Terrorism, Secret Documents Show (265 points, 100 comments)
    5. Conservatives accused of free speech double standard after Catholic university blocks abortion film (216 points, 143 comments)
    6. Federal government proposes changes designed to drop cost of patented drugs (173 points, 40 comments)
    7. Andrew Coyne: Tories can stop blowing smoke because there’s nothing suspicious about Morneau share selloff (144 points, 100 comments)
    8. Trudeau government wants to 'demystify' G7 summit by involving Canadians (132 points, 37 comments)
    9. Canadian workforce is more educated and sitting in traffic longer than ever before: 2016 census (104 points, 15 comments)
    10. Conservative party leadership advisor helped create anti-Islam organization (90 points, 54 comments)
  2. 1991 points, 109 submissions: idspispopd
    1. Video of starving polar bear in Canada's Arctic re-ignites conversations about climate change (209 points, 131 comments)
    2. Proportional Representation Will Provide Balance, Not Extremism (199 points, 145 comments)
    3. Manitoba gets failing grade for 'nightmare' rates of child poverty (124 points, 25 comments)
    4. N.W.T. residents can now choose 'X' as gender on IDs (87 points, 36 comments)
    5. Nunavut creates country food safety guidelines to boost traditional menus across territory (87 points, 40 comments)
    6. 'We want Nunavut to shine:' Territory's new premier looks to the future (82 points, 5 comments)
    7. B.C.’s upcoming referendum on electoral reform will stand, Attorney-General says (82 points, 50 comments)
    8. Jagmeet Singh takes shot at Jason Kenney in swing through Alberta (62 points, 28 comments)
    9. Uniformed police won’t be allowed to march in Vancouver’s Pride Parade (56 points, 85 comments)
    10. Thawing permafrost causes $51M in damages every year to N.W.T. public infrastructure: study (48 points, 4 comments)
  3. 1548 points, 14 submissions: steadly
    1. This Conservative Politician Said Weed Is Just As Deadly as Fentanyl (492 points, 176 comments)
    2. Prime Minister announces nomination of the Honourable Sheilah L. Martin to the Supreme Court of Canada (283 points, 146 comments)
    3. Liberals 41, Conservatives 30, NDP 18, Green 7 : Nanos (147 points, 79 comments)
    4. Bill Morneau says Ottawa has no plans for a Netflix tax (132 points, 46 comments)
    5. Prime Minister names the Honourable Richard Wagner as new Chief Justice of Canada (113 points, 48 comments)
    6. Singh launched NDP byelection campaign in wrong Scarborough riding (113 points, 75 comments)
    7. Trudeau government sets new record for vacant appointments (62 points, 23 comments)
    8. Prime Minister announces the appointment of two new Senators (53 points, 42 comments)
    9. Cabinet ministers don't resign nowadays, they just linger and then get shuffled (39 points, 1 comment)
    10. $100 million for gay purge victims as PM apologizes for LGBTQ discrimination (33 points, 6 comments)
  4. 1235 points, 19 submissions: MethoxyEthane
    1. Federal marijuana legislation passed third reading in the House of Commons, headed for the Senate (215 points, 96 comments)
    2. Trudeau says Canadians need a 'mindset change' to tackle sexual assault (191 points, 85 comments)
    3. PEI Green Party win their second seat in the Charlottetown-Parkdale provincial by-election (109 points, 28 comments)
    4. Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown releases full platform 6 months ahead of provincial campaign (104 points, 137 comments)
    5. Speaker kicks Tory MP Blake Richards out of Question Period (95 points, 31 comments)
    6. Premier Kathleen Wynne sues opposition leader Patrick Brown for defamation (90 points, 56 comments)
    7. Trudeau set to name new judge to Supreme Court of Canada on Wednesday morning (87 points, 31 comments)
    8. Kathleen Wynne calls $12B in savings in PC platform ‘ridiculous’ (83 points, 68 comments)
    9. Liberal government backs bill that demands full implementation of UN Indigenous rights declaration (55 points, 41 comments)
    10. December 11 By-Election Discussion Thread (49 points, 322 comments)
  5. 1094 points, 5 submissions: StrudleNudle
    1. Comparing marijuana to fentanyl is social conservatism without a clue: Opinion (723 points, 115 comments)
    2. Liberals rebound in polls, Nanos says women giving Grits lead over Conservatives - The Hill Times (161 points, 185 comments)
    3. Liberals 40, Conservatives 31, NDP 17, Green 7: Nanos (112 points, 116 comments)
    4. 'Charterpedia' launched by the DOJ today. Summarizes every Charter right and it's completely noted up. (87 points, 21 comments)
    5. Tory pit bull Poilievre looks for ‘vulnerability’ in attacks on Morneau (11 points, 13 comments)
  6. 894 points, 34 submissions: uadoption
    1. Conservative comparison of pot to fentanyl 'irresponsible': Health minister (223 points, 29 comments)
    2. Canada vows to aggressively defend lumber sector after duties confirmed by U.S. (207 points, 43 comments)
    3. ‘Keep our great country safe from all the weed,’ Conservative critic pleads in Parliament poem (115 points, 107 comments)
    4. Driverless trucks are coming to Canada and the impact will be profound (108 points, 172 comments)
    5. The secret of happiness for Quebec anglos (26 points, 83 comments)
    6. Making the link between animal and human abuse (23 points, 9 comments)
    7. Bell's 'Let's Talk' campaign rings hollow for employees suffering panic attacks, vomiting and anxiety (16 points, 7 comments)
    8. Watch China's efforts to influence as Canada pursues trade, says former envoy (15 points, 0 comments)
    9. Nearly half of illegal border-crossers into Canada are from Haiti (14 points, 7 comments)
    10. Refugee system isn't for those seeking better economic life: Trudeau (14 points, 2 comments)
  7. 891 points, 30 submissions: OrzBlueFog
    1. Maxime Bernier reiterates opposition to Net Neutrality (352 points, 173 comments)
    2. Unionized Halifax Shipyard workers vote 99% in favour of strike mandate [NS] (204 points, 55 comments)
    3. Nova Scotia announces pot will be sold through NSLC and online [NS] (72 points, 13 comments)
    4. Feds willing to give more pot tax revenue to provinces to help municipalities (60 points, 15 comments)
    5. Live at a tony address? Postal Code Project puts Canada's richest neighbourhoods in taxman's crosshairs (26 points, 12 comments)
    6. [Meta] Comment sort order - controversial? (26 points, 29 comments)
    7. Child Advocate wins battle for mandatory reporting of deaths, critical injuries [NL] (15 points, 0 comments)
    8. Nova Scotia community hopes rocket launch site will revitalize economy [NS] (13 points, 5 comments)
    9. NDP executives resign in protest over party leader Gary Burrill [NS] (12 points, 2 comments)
    10. Former Dion human rights aide pans Ottawa arms-control plans (11 points, 1 comment)
  8. 765 points, 1 submission: GumboBenoit
    1. As US prepares to gut net neutrality rules, Canada strengthens them (765 points, 112 comments)
  9. 716 points, 5 submissions: BattlestarBattaglia
    1. Inside Bell's Push To End Net Neutrality In Canada (479 points, 91 comments)
    2. Fraud investigation casts cloud over Ontario PCs’ platform launch (78 points, 23 comments)
    3. Patrick Brown’s fiscally risky, economically dubious plan for Ontario (66 points, 49 comments)
    4. Wynne says PC leader Patrick Brown’s hope of finding painless cuts is ‘nonsense’ (47 points, 33 comments)
    5. Police sift through ballot boxes in Hamilton PC nomination investigation (46 points, 4 comments)
  10. 710 points, 31 submissions: scottb84
    1. As Canadians consume ‘harmful’ levels of sodium, officials urge chefs to limit salt but face resistance (157 points, 109 comments)
    2. University of Toronto contract academic staff vote 91% in favour of strike mandate (82 points, 9 comments)
    3. The Deadly Racism of Thunder Bay: A series of stalled police investigations reveals a city that’s indifferent to Indigenous lives (73 points, 52 comments)
    4. No, postmodernism at universities isn'€™t a vile, cancerous doctrine (64 points, 88 comments)
    5. Toss of the Bitcoin: Canadians have poured millions into blockchain, but many don’t know what they’re buying (51 points, 33 comments)
    6. Andrew Scheer’s dad jeans and awkward hellos are painstakingly deliberate (43 points, 64 comments)
    7. The Misguided Fight Against Sex-Ed Reform: Alberta’s proposed curriculum has been met with the same tired controversy—and it isn’t making kids any safer (36 points, 3 comments)
    8. Toronto rental vacancy rates lowest in 16 years (32 points, 3 comments)
    9. Booze, drugs involved in 73 oilsands safety incidents since 2013, Suncor says (20 points, 7 comments)
    10. Buzzkillers: A brief history of the LCBO (17 points, 0 comments)
  11. 707 points, 30 submissions: kingbuns2
    1. Map showing Post-Secondary Degrees of Canadian MPs | Created by CanadianHistorian (152 points, 78 comments)
    2. Inuit want free travel over international waters between Canada, Greenland (104 points, 18 comments)
    3. On the Rails: A Case for Renewed Leftist Infatuation with Transport (80 points, 44 comments)
    4. Trudeau says housing is a human right — what does that mean exactly? UN says such a recognition does not mean the government has to build all of the nation's housing stock (68 points, 29 comments)
    5. Poll reveals Canadians' view of residential schools (36 points, 41 comments)
    6. Cashing In On Trump’s War on Universities: Republicans are gutting U.S. education; Canada — with boldness — can reap the benefits (30 points, 2 comments)
    7. Activists say Ottawa should deliver housing funds over two years, instead of 11 (29 points, 3 comments)
    8. African aid can’t keep up with stolen wealth (23 points, 4 comments)
    9. B.C. needs a brisk boost to $15/hr minimum wage: No reason for province to take a slower road than Ontario or Alberta (23 points, 20 comments)
    10. Postmedia, Torstar Marching Toward Media Monopolies: Journalism suffers as corporations swap papers to end competition (18 points, 1 comment)
  12. 695 points, 3 submissions: floatingpaper
    1. Canada will not move embassy to Jerusalem, federal government says (378 points, 236 comments)
    2. Ontario passes Cannabis Act, will take effect July 1, 2018 | Toronto Star (273 points, 166 comments)
    3. I highly recommend the show Political Blind Date by TVO. (44 points, 7 comments)
  13. 583 points, 3 submissions: Savage_N0ble
    1. Canadians want Ottawa to ban use of tax havens, poll finds | Toronto Star (478 points, 125 comments)
    2. Ottawa pressed on new registry to flush out mystery corporations (66 points, 26 comments)
    3. When it comes to harassment in politics, powerful people are writing rules for themselves: Neil Macdonald - CBC News (39 points, 13 comments)
  14. 554 points, 8 submissions: ThornyPlebeian
    1. Canada Jobless Rate Falls to Lowest in a Decade on Hiring Surge (228 points, 93 comments)
    2. Liberal Gordie Hogg defeats former Tory cabinet minister in South Surrey-White Rock (179 points, 94 comments)
    3. Trudeau to offer formal apology for LGBTQ persecution (70 points, 76 comments)
    4. Liberal MP accuses Conservative James Bezan of ‘humiliating’ sexual comments (48 points, 56 comments)
    5. Feds table bill to expunge 'unjust' convictions of LGBTQ Canadians (16 points, 16 comments)
    6. New fighter-jet competition to have 'economic interest' requirement (10 points, 8 comments)
    7. PM Trudeau strayed too far from historic wrongs in LGBTQ apology: Tory MPs (2 points, 0 comments)
    8. Canadian Surface Combatant team, led by Lockheed Martin Canada, unveiled (1 point, 5 comments)
  15. 539 points, 21 submissions: CytheYounger
    1. Canadian hate crimes growing and more violent for third straight year (302 points, 300 comments)
    2. Big Oil abandoning Canada’s oilsands in quest for cleaner crude (48 points, 39 comments)
    3. Washington Governor Touts Vancouver-Portland High-Speed Rail (44 points, 8 comments)
    4. Alberta's Rachel Notley urges Trudeau to speak up for pipelines (43 points, 77 comments)
    5. Despite What Politicians Say, Hundreds of BC Gas Wells Leak Methane (30 points, 8 comments)
    6. How will Canada manage its wildfires in the future? (13 points, 2 comments)
    7. Firestorm: Fort McMurray wildfire is a warning, book claims (9 points, 5 comments)
    8. New UBC-led report finds alternatives to Site C creates significantly more jobs, produce electricity at a lower cost with lower risks, have a significantly lower environmental impact, and produce less greenhouse gas emissions. (8 points, 5 comments)
    9. Behind the Mask of the ‘Moderates’ (7 points, 32 comments)
    10. B.C. oil spill response times make Trans Mountain Pipeline 'a ticking time bomb' (6 points, 8 comments)
  16. 451 points, 13 submissions: gwaksl
    1. Andrew Scheer's Everyman image won't be enough to beat Justin Trudeau - Macleans.ca (104 points, 142 comments)
    2. Federal Poll Average: LPC 38.64, CPC 31.43, NDP 16.76, GPC 6.81, BQ 4.73 (61 points, 59 comments)
    3. Liberals 39, Conservatives 31, NDP 17, Green 7: Nanos (59 points, 37 comments)
    4. Andrew Scheer weighs in on Catholic university that banned abortion film | Globalnews.ca (49 points, 54 comments)
    5. Liberals reject warship proposal that companies said would save taxpayers as much as $32B (49 points, 26 comments)
    6. COMMENTARY: The NDP had better get their act together (for the Tories’ sake!) - National | Globalnews.ca (30 points, 56 comments)
    7. Canada’s global prosperity ranking slips to lowest level in 11 years, but we still beat the U.S. | Financial Post (30 points, 16 comments)
    8. The 'free the beer' court case shows Canada isn't a true economic union (30 points, 25 comments)
    9. Weighted Poll Averages Post Singh (25 points, 10 comments)
    10. John Ivison: New private member’s bill could mean end of the Happy Meal in Canada (6 points, 3 comments)
  17. 444 points, 15 submissions: sluttytinkerbells
    1. Globe editorial: Taking the ‘hi’ out of ‘bonjour-hi’ won’t save the French language (88 points, 106 comments)
    2. Legal marijuana deadline may be up in smoke as Tory senators stall bills (73 points, 48 comments)
    3. Employer who stole nearly $3M in wages from 157 workers fined $500 (54 points, 16 comments)
    4. Migrant workers’ group slams NDP’s Singh for online posts on farm visit (49 points, 20 comments)
    5. Canada should fight for open internet, says former head of FCC - Politics (47 points, 13 comments)
    6. 2 more Winnipeg police officers charged with impaired driving (46 points, 5 comments)
    7. Alberta man convicted of criminal harassment following Creep Catcher incident (29 points, 4 comments)
    8. North Korean defectors in Toronto worried they may be deported: ‘They treat us like garbage’ (19 points, 10 comments)
    9. Immigrant French lesson program a failure: auditor general (15 points, 4 comments)
    10. Hydro One’s prepaid meter proposal sparks criticism | Toronto Star (7 points, 3 comments)
  18. 434 points, 2 submissions: NeutralEvilCarebear
    1. ‘He said, No, no, no’: Trump tells crowd about trade disagreement with Trudeau (264 points, 102 comments)
    2. Here’s all the Canadian senators who just awarded themselves a medal meant to honour ‘unsung heroes’ (170 points, 32 comments)

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[Table] IAmA: I am Steve Horwitz, economist, professor at St Lawrence University, and bleeding heart libertarian . AMA!

Verified? (This bot cannot verify AMAs just yet)
Date: 2014-02-28
Link to submission (Has self-text)
Questions Answers
Do you think the relative unpopularity of economic liberty (laissez faire) as a policy is due to people's lack of knowledge or some predilection in favor of tangible, sold 'plans' over the unpredictability of freedom? Or neither or some mix of both? All great questions. I think your instinct is right here: people prefer the (false) security of a "plan" than the more open-ended promise of market discovery. Part of the way to deal with that is to point out how often those plans fail and their propensity to generate unintended consequences that make matters WORSE and then generate a demand for more intervention, etc..
As a followup, how do you convince people to put their faith in free markets and free people without promising some specific plan or specific outcome? Saying "the free market will fix it" doesn't seem satisfying to most people. If you can't trust a lot of people to solve smaller problems in decentralized ways with a functioning feedback process, how can you trust a small number to solve big problems with a crappy feedback process?
Do you support open borders? If so, do you think a large enough influx of immigrants from a different culture could produce such negative externalities in the process of assimilation that on net, they destroy more wealth than they create? My friend Bryan Caplan did an AMA a little while back and I have the same views as he does on open borders, which is keep 'em wide open. I don't fear the scenario you lay out here because there's no history to support it. Immigrants who come here do so because they want to make their lives better and help their families in the process. As they assimilate, they will not just complete "become us," we will become more like them. Thinik about all the ways in which what was once immigrant food and culture have become part of who we are as Americans (that pizza you're eating..). Assimilation is a two-way street and has many more positive than negative externalities. Plus, it's a simple matter of human rights and bleeding heart libertarianism that we should give those with the least all around the world the opportunity to make a better life for themselves by recognizing their right to move to where the opportunities are and create work and property contracts with those who live there. I simply cannot see how any libertarian can support anything less than open borders on both practical and moral grounds.
What is a bleeding heart libertarian? I'd also like to tackle this one early. BHLs come in various flavors. What we all seem to share is that we think the primary moral concern of libertarians, if not any political philosophy, should be how well our preferred system will do for the least well off among us. For some of my BHL colleagues is is that concern that is the moral justification for any system, i.e., libertarianism is only moral justified in so far as it improves the lives of the least well off. For others, like me, it's more about rhetoric and style. I believe that libertarianism DOES serve their interests very well, but I think it's more that we should focus our arguments and our rhetoric on that point, rather than thinking it serves as the ultimate moral justification.
BHLs generally believe that libertarianism can meet the ENDS of our leftist friends concerned with social justice but through the MEANS of freedom.
So "a rising tide lifts all boats" will now be stated as...hmmm... "Free people make better choice for themselves and have better outcomes"? It lifts ALL boats, but it also lifts the LEAST WELL OFF boats the most.
Not much freedom if you are poor. How about "you're far more likely to be poor if you have no freedom." The Berlin Wall was not there to keep people in WEST Germany.
WARNING: I am a Marxist, please do not be alarmed. With that out of the way, I was wondering if you could answer this question from a Libertarian standpoint: With industry as vast and as awe-inspiring as it is today I was wondering why you think it is still a good idea to continue the practice of private ownership over the goods that industry produces? It seems to me that, in light of current global economic "problems" (to say the least), we could simply cut the bullshit. Put people into industries, have them (the workers) collectively run the workplace. With people who aren't concerned with competition but cooperation it seems that they would most likely focus on lifting themselves (them being the community of whichever particular area, town,city,village,whatever) out of poverty, and if we continue this practice across countries, the entire globe even, it seems that we could lift massive amounts of poverty and ignorance off of millions of people. Why bother bickering about this-or-that style of Capitalism, why not just throw the damn thing overboard, like we did feudalism, and finally start using industry for more than profit hoarding and worthless vanity items? THanks for the question. I think you radically undersestimate the problems of determining how to use resources in ways that improve economic well-being. First, markets ARE about cooperation. Did you make your shirt? I'm guessing not. That shirt was make through the cooperation of millions of people from across the globe, coordinating their activity through the prices, profits, and losses of the market. Markets are the most powerful form of social cooperation (and globally so) that humans have ever discovered. You need to get beyond the competition/cooperation binary.
Second, in order to know how best to use resource to improve people's lives, we need to know their value. That requires a standard of comparison that relates back to people's wants and needs. And that is what prices do. Monetary exchange and the price system are form of extra-linguistic communication that enable us to assess value. To have meaningful prices, we need them to arise from actual exchanges by real people in real markets. And that requires private ownership, especially of capital. How would all of these firms know 1) what to make 2) how to make it? It is market prices, profits, and loss that facilitate the social learning process that enables us to answer these questions.
Profit is a social signal and what justifies using markets is that they are the only way we have of answering all of these questions about what to produce and how to produce it. If we get rid of markets, we are not giving the tin man a heart, we are Oedipus poking out our eyes.
What do you think of the latest developments affecting the bitcoin ecosystem? To be honest, I don't follow bitcoin that closely. I have long believed that we need to get rid of central banks, so I'm in favor of anything that creates an alternative to central banking, thus I"m rooting for bitcoin. But I'm also skeptical about it because I'm not convinced it will be anything more than a niche way of engaging in very sophisticated multi-lateral barter, but with limits. That said, I want it to stick around if for no other reason than to show folks that you don't need government to get sound money. Because... you don't.
How would we regulate the economy without central banks? The history of economies without central banks and with truly competitive monetary systems is that they are much more stable and much less prone to bank failures and monetary mischief than ones with central banks. Canada did not have a central bank til the 1930s and never had the problems the US did. Link to www.coordinationproblem.org
Prof. Horwitz, given your work on family, what changes do you think should be considered to welfare policies? In my ideal libertarian world, the need for such assistance would be far less and it would be provided by the various institutions of civil society. If you haven't read Dave Beito's From Mutual Aid to the Welfare State, there's the place to start. If the state is going to be involved, I would like to see two kinds of related changes. We need to get away from welfare systems that create perverse incentives that discourage the formation of healthy families. The tax/welfare system is so full of special interest nonsense that it creates huge incentives for poor folks not to get married, when doing so can be one (but not the only) way to help them climb the income ladder. The second change is to move toward some sort of basic guaranteed income program. It's not my first best, but it's far better than the status quo. If nothing else, it has far less overhead cost to taxpayers and gets rid of many of the perverse incentives of the current welfare system, especially with respect to marriage adn families. It's also FAR less intrusive on people's privacy.
Wouldn't guaranteed income give people even more of an incentive not to work? It's not clear that it's worse than the status quo and at far less cost. But yes, that's a potential problem and the literature on BGI tries to deal with it. You should google the recent discussion of this topic on bleeding heart libertarians.
Wouldn't a UBI be a forced redistribution of wealth that flies in the face of the non-aggression principal? Again, it's a second best.
Plus, I don't ground my libertarianism in the non-aggression principle. If you could show me that a world with a large government was better than a world with a small or non-existent one, I'd be fine with the large government. I care about consequences first and foremost.
Are there any areas of research where you'd like to see more libertarians focusing their efforts? Are there any areas that draw too much focus from libertarians? Thank you for doing an AMA! In general, there's too many damn economists! I think there are a ton of interesting questions that we should be tackling with more gusto. I'd like to see us do more on family and children, which is why I am working on a book on that topic, but I'd like to see it from a variety of perspectives, such as psychology. I don't think libertarians have done enough history. There are so many interesting historical episodes that could benefit from a reading through the eyes of Mises or Hayek or other libertarian thinkers, including outside economics. I'd love an army of young libertarian scholars taking on those topics, especially the ones related to race and gender, to show how the standard readings of those events, which tend to support bigger government, actually tend to show that government causes way more problems than it cures.
What is your opinion on the Civil Rights Act of 1964? The CRA did two things. One, it banned government sponsored discrimination such as that associated with Jim Crow (and let's not forget that Jim Crow was the state and that many private firms opposed it). Two, it banned private discrimination on the basis of race - the counter at Woolworth's.
The first was a HUGE gain for liberty and I obviously support it strongly. One element of libertarianism/classical liberalism is that IF there's a state, it must treat all citizens the same. Equality before the law is a libertarian principle.
The second was a loss for liberty - the loss of freedom of association and that's a bad thing. On net, the gains of the CRA, in my view, strongly outweighed the losses, and in the imperfect world of politics, it was the best anyone was going to get in 1964. Had I been in Congress as a libertarian, I would have voted for it.
One additional note though: with the advent of fast communications technology and the net, the belief that markets and civil society could not sufficiently punish private discriminators seems farfetched. Can you imagine what people would do on Yelp (or here!) if a restaurant put up a "no blacks served" sign? Or a "no gays" one? It's harder for bigots to hide these days, esp. when the tolerance level for those behaviors is so low.
So yes, the CRA wasn't perfect from a libertarian perspective, but it was a big improvement.
What is one thing you believe that most libertarians do not? Or: What is one thing you disagree with most libertarians about? I love this question. I think the answer to both is the same: I am much more sympathetic to feminism, even of the non-libertarian sort, than are most libertarians. The result is a lot of arguments. I think that libertarians have done to feminism exactly what libertarians accuse others of doing to us: taking the most extreme and silly people as representative of what's typical. My experience of 25 years in academia with lots of left feminists is that the libertarian caricature of them is simply unrecognizable. Yes, that caricature exists, but those are the Alex Jones's of feminism - they are not the typical one, even among academics.
What's the state of libertarianism in other parts of the world? Not only in Europe, but perhaps in Asia, Africa and Latin America? How's it'views in Austria? :-) What do you think happens in Malaysia, Hong Kong and Cayman Islands, is libertarian philosophy used to justify part of the status quo there? Are you in contact with any intellectual from there? Where is libertarianism, as an offical party, is stronger and where has it won elections, finally if so, how did it go? TKS! I have never been more optimistic about the growth and influence of libertarian ideas globally than I am now. In particulary, the growth of STudents for Liberty across the world as well as the ways in which technology has made ideas and resources available, along with the development of dozens of think tanks, are good evidence that these ideas are developing a presence and being heard globally.
What's the best financial advice you have for young people? Let's start with an easy one: Pay your bills on time. Seriously. If you establish a reputation for being someone who lives up to their promises and understands the importance of financial trust, other things will follow from there. This is so important for things like your credit rating and the like. If you're in college or just out, this should be your priority. After that? Just remember that you will have a future and the future you will be happy that the present you did not put him/her in too much debt and that you saved something for a rainy day or two. But the easy best advice: pay your bills on time all the time.
So your saying paying 60,000 a year for SLU isn't a great investment. It isn't for everyone! Depends on your net cost, your ability to handle debt, what you want to do with your life etc. For some people it is a great investment, not for others. I'm not someone who thinks everyone should go to college.
If state intervention is generally counterproductive, why do the Nordic/Western European countries rank higher than the United States does in quality of life, education, environment, etc.? Because many of those countries actually have freer economies than the US, which now ranks 17th free across the globe, as the commenter below notes.
If you could debate any intellectual and/or public figure who would it be? Rachel Maddow. I want to wipe that smug smile right off her face. :)
I would love to see that! Mostly because you're the one who's coming off smug right now. Nicely played.
On election day, there are a lot of libertarians making a point of the fact they don't vote. Do you vote? How do libertarians expect to change government if you don't vote? I do not vote. I don't think it's immoral/wrong to vote. I just think that's largely ineffective.
Social change comes from changing the climate of ideas, like doing an AMA, or teaching economics, or doing a program on House of Cards, or writing a letter to the editor, or dozens of other acts of engaged, concerned citizenship we might choose to engage in. Voting, to me, is just not an effective path to social change.
Is there a better term than "invisible hand" which is often mocked, to describe the invisible hand? Great question. It shouldn't get the bad press it does, as Smith was a genius who people outside economics should be reading and taking way more seriously than they do. I tend to use "spontaneous order" which is usually associated with Hayek, though he got it from the philosopher-chemist Michael Polanyi. The idea is that the order of the market is the product of human action, but not human design. You can talk of "emergent order" as well, as "emergence" in that sense is hot in complexity theory and the sciences.
But I think the best way to do this, especially with lefitsts, is to make the analogies to evolution by natural selection. If people believe that the natural world is orderly but without a designer, then they should be open to the argument that the social world is too. If you think "Intelligent Design" is a joke in biology, then you should think "Intelligent Economic Planning" is the equivalent joke in economics. HEre's an old and short blog post of mine on this issue: Link to www.coordinationproblem.org
After NYTimes published an article attacking Rand Paul you made comments about how libertarians ought to "call out" people with racist/sexist et al attitudes within the movement; you also personally stated your refusal to cooperate with such persons, even in efforts against the state. The answer to your last question is yes. I have plenty of libertarian friends who believe things I think are wrong, but we still work together productively. That's one of the healthiest signs in our movement - we HAVE disagreements and can work together in spite of them.
I was wondering, do you really believe there should be such red lines in the sand, even if you and the other person agree on a majority of public policy issues? If so, what is your own personal red line? Do you think it's possible for libertarians to cooperate on the issues they agree on whilst criticizing each other on the things they disagree on? If a person or institution continually supports positions that I think are deeply wrong, and especially when I think that position also undermines the good work being done by other libertarians, we should call them out on it. Social pressure and shunning is not coercion. It's freedom of disassociation. And we should use it.
Steve, what do you say to "established" - read Keynesian economists who argue that libertarians are not "evidence" focused or logically consistent? One thing I do is point them to the link below and open a discussion about what we mean by "evidence": Link to www.cato-unbound.org It's also important to remember the economics world does not divide into two groups: "libertarians" and "Keynesians." There are all kinds of flavors here and we need to recognize those differences.
What is the best way to try to convince/change the minds of those who are generally inclined toward state intervention to solve problems? Show them the practical consequences of intervention and of markets. This is why we need really good empirical work, especially good history. For example, the more we write and talk about the Great Recession and have a great command of the facts to explain why it was a failure of policy not markets, the more likely we are to push people in our direction. History is very powerful in setting people's narratives and we need counter-narratives. I also think that we need to be very mindful of our rhetoric. We CANNOT say things that allow others to tag us as racists/sexists etc, or that we don't care about the poor. And we need to be unafraid to call out leftists (for example) who make that accusation over policy differences. Objecting to minimum wage laws is NOT racist and people who say it is need to be called out both for their historical ignorance (it's the MW laws that are racist!) and for their refusal to discuss in good faith.
How do you feel about the state helping those who can't help themselves? For example, should the state step in for cases of child/elder abuse? These are IMO some of the hardest issues for libertarians. Let me stay with child abuse. I think first we have to distinguish abuse and neglect. I think with neglect, there are ways that non-state institutions can work with families to improve outcomes. And, importantly, we have to ask "compared to what?" Perhaps the child is in less than optimal circumstances, but will that be improved upon if the state moves them somewhere else?
In general, I think that there are Hayekian reasons to think that parents have the best knowledge and incentives to do what's right for their kids, so the bar for state intervention should always be quite high - and the state should bear the burden of proof.
If we are talking abuse, then different story. If the state has the responsibility for protecting the rights of adults against violence from others, then it has that same right with respect to children and violence form their parents. I am a strong defender of parental rights, but those do not extend to clear cases of abuse (as opposed to mild forms of corporal punishment). But even here, the state should be working with extended family, friends, and organizations like synagogues or churches or the like to find solutions that minimize the impact on kids.
As to how an anarchist society would handle these situations, my honest answer is that I do not know.
Where is the brightline between neglect and abuse? Punishment to some people is much harsher than others. A girl recently died of hypothermia near where I live because staying outside in a barn was used as punishment. THere's not a brightline. We shouldn't expect one either. That's why these issues are so hard.
Do you get along with the Keynsians or do you sit on oppostie sides of the room at the faculty Christmas party? Every single one of my closest friends on the SLU faculty is a leftist.
Consortin' with the enemy, eh? ;) I'm a consorter from way back.
Keynesians are "leftists" like Republicans are "capitalists". In fact even calling Keynesians, who are by definition capitalist, "leftists" is sort of silly. That said, I know this AMA is dead and I don't expect a response but as a left libertarian I just wanted to say that chafed me a little. I meant leftist. Not Keynesian. My friends on the faculty are leftists not Keynesians.
Related to your research on families, what do you think about the advice (usually coming from the right) that one of the most beneficial things the poor can do to improve their lot in life is to get married? There's some truth to that, but it's more complicated than it's been presented as. Married people DO have much better outcomes along almost any measure you care to look at (including their sex lives). But that doesn't mean you should just "get married" regardless of who the other person is and what your particular circumstances are. And as I noted earlier, public policy distorts the incentives to marry in ways that encourages it where it shouldn't and discourages it where people could benefit from marriage. So yeah, marriage is good for people (gays and lesbians too), but that's not "get married no matter what."
Do you worry that a free market is too concerned with the present and not suited to deal with long term problems, like climate change? Hypothetically, if we could see that the free market was bringing about a catastrophe, should we intervene with our best idea of what suitable regulation would be? Do you think a system in which the participants are almost exclusively concerned with what will happen in the next 2, 4, or 6 years is MORE capable of thinking in the long term than the owners of capital who can pass its value to others over an indefinite time frame? I think that markets are far better able to think about the long run than is the political system, assuming that the right institutional structure is in place in the market.
How would we even know the market was bringing about a catastrophe? What's the sort of scenario you have in mind? (It probably shouldn't be climate change because that has to account for gov't)
Do you deny the positive effects of the 2009 American Recovery Act (ARA) on the U.S. economy? China has used both a market-based and state-based approach in concert to create a strong economy. Does this indicate to you that the state should have some economic control? Yes I deny them. Where was the "market-based" approach? And where is the strong economy? Millions have left the labor force. Unemployment remains notably higher than was predicted if we passed the ARRA. Private investment is still very low. The recovery in employment is the slowest since the Great Depression.
So, does this theory reject the phenomenon that markets will overheat, or ever need to be stimulated? Markets are not physical systems, they are human ones. Using metaphors from physical systems gets us off on the wrong track.
Are you relating the free-market to House of Cards? How is the online class going to be structured and what will it be about? Also, can you pinpoint an event in history where a free-market system has prevailed? It's about how HoC shows the failures of the political system through the lens of Public Cholce Theory. You will get to see some video lectures by me as well as other videos on line, plus participate in online discussions on Facebook and real-time chats.
Do you watch Parks and Rec? If so, how do you feel about Ron Swanson's portrayal of Libertarianism? I don't. I should. So I can't answer this one. Sorry.
Do you think our lack of growth comes from a deficiency of inflation like the Federal Reserve suggests? Do you think we are experiencing deflation/stagflation that is being papered over by monetary easing/competitive devaluation or do you believe the FED is 'exporting' inflation to EM currencies through carry trades given the inflation rates of the EM markets? We are not suffering from too little inflation. We are suffering from too much regulation, too much uncertainty, too much anti-business rhetoric, and a central bank that won't adhere to the rule of law. (And it's the Fed not the FED - sorry, pet peeve :) ).
Tonight is TV night with my GF. House of Cards or True Detective? Which show should I start tonight? I haven't watched TD, but man do I love House of Cards.
Hey Steve. Should they legalize pot, or what? They should legalize pot... and "what", as well. :)
How do you respond to the accusation that you don't care about poor people when you oppose raising the minimum wage? (This happened to me, recently.) I send them here: Link to www.fee.org
Why free markets are both the most efficient and most resilient systems? Because they are best at discovering and making use of dispersed, contextual, and often inarticulate human knowledge. They are social learning processes with very powerful feedback processes that help us know when we've made mistakes and provide incentives to correct them.
Markets aren't better because people make fewer mistakes in the market than in government (think about all the restaurants that fail). They are better because those failures take place in an institutional structure that provides knowledge and signals for everyone else to correct them in ways that political institutions do not.
What are your thoughts on the arguments that market anarchists like Michael Huemer and Roderick Long put forward? Specifically in regards to markets in law and defense. I consider myself to be a market anarchist (at least most days). While I'm not sure I can provide an answer to how markets and civil society might solve every problem, I have yet to be convinced by an explanation for how the state could. The burden of proof is on the state and it hasn't met it yet, but that doesn't mean we "know" markets/voluntary social cooperation have the answers to the tough questions like those.
I am much more persuaded by arguments for polycentric legal systems than for privatized defense. But here too - does anyone really believe that gov't does a good job defending us, especially when we consider the rent-seeking involved and the ways in which the tools the state adopts to "defend" us quickly oppress us - think the NSA/war on terror.
I"ll take my chances with the unknown over the known evil.
What are you having for dinner? Mediocre Mexican is the plan. That's as good as Mexican gets up here in the hinterlands.
What's your response to more Rothbardian readings of Human Action that take more radical claims about the supremacy of a priorism? I would LOVE to come to Hillsdale. I've talked with folks there about doing so, but we can't seem to find a time that works.
Also, would you mind coming to Hillsdale College sometimes soon to give a lecture if I say pretty please and promise a brownie? I think those Rothbardian readings are mistaken. Here's some thoughts on Mises and methodology that might explain why: Link to www.cato-unbound.org
Do you feel the Austrian School was strengthened or discredited internationally as a result of the Great Recession? Only reason I've asked is that I've heard both and you seem to be a more credible source on the issue then some other media sources I could name. Strengthened. Austrians have had more positive attention, and deservedly so, because I do think that Austrian theory provides a very powerful lens with which to understand the boom, bust, and crisis. Link to www.fee.org
Any good books about economy for a high schooler? You can always start with "Economics in One Lesson". Also a new book by Howard Baetjer "Free Our Markets."
Prof. Horwitz, what books (either by Hayek or about him) do you consider the best for a student to start learning about F.A.? Individualism and Economic Order Constitution of Liberty
Favorite rush song/album? "Natural Science" and "Moving Pictures" Link to myslu.stlawu.edu
How many Bitcoins did you lose in this "Magic the Gathering Online Exchange" silliness? Zero. I own none. I have never owned any.
I've never listened to Rush. What song should I start with? Wow. THat depends. What's your taste in music and how much of a libertarian are you? :)
Are you a feminist? I'd like to think so, but others might disagree.
What are your thoughts on monetary inflation? What do you believe would be a better system than the federal reserve determining how much new money to print? I am an advocate of "free banking." Link to www.youtube.com
What's your favorite part of northern ny? Ps. I don't miss the cold. The people.
What do you suggest against the prisoner's dillemma? Find me a real world case where the parties could not communicate and/or solve the problem through the reputational effects of repeated play.
Last updated: 2014-03-04 19:49 UTC
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