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A Detailed Summary of Every Single Reason Why I am Bullish on Ethereum

The following will be a list of the many reasons why I hold and am extremely bullish on ETH.

This is an extremely long post. If you just want the hopium without the detail, read the TL;DR at the bottom.

ETH 2.0

As we all know, ETH 2.0 phase 0 is right around the corner. This will lock up ETH and stakers will earn interest on their ETH in return for securing the network. Next comes phase 1 where the ETH 2 shards are introduced, shards are essentially parallel blockchains which are each responsible for a different part of Ethereum’s workload, think of it like a multi-core processor vs a single core processor. During phase 1, these shards will only act as data availability layers and won’t actually process transactions yet. However, their data can be utilised by the L2 scaling solution, rollups, increasing Ethereum’s throughput in transactions per second up to 100,000 TPS.
After phase 1 comes phase 1.5 which will move the ETH 1.0 chain into an ETH 2 shard and Ethereum will be fully secured by proof of stake. This means that ETH issuance will drop from around 5% per year to less than 1% and with EIP-1559, ETH might become a deflationary asset, but more on that later.
Finally, with ETH 2.0 phase two, each shard will be fully functional chains. With 64 of them, we can expect the base layer of Ethereum to scale around 64x, not including the massive scaling which comes from layer 2 scaling solutions like rollups as previously mentioned.
While the scaling benefits and ETH issuance reduction which comes with ETH 2.0 will be massive, they aren’t the only benefits. We also get benefits such as increased security from PoS compared to PoW, a huge energy efficiency improvement due to the removal of PoW and also the addition of eWASM which will allow contracts to be programmed in a wide range of programming languages, opening the floodgates for millions of web devs who want to be involved in Ethereum but don’t know Ethereum’s programming language, Solidity.

EIP-1559 and ETH scarcity

As I covered in a previous post of mine, ETH doesn’t have a supply cap like Bitcoin. Instead, it has a monetary policy of “minimum viable issuance”, not only is this is a good thing for network security, but with the addition of EIP-1559, it leaves the door open to the possibility of ETH issuance going negative. In short, EIP-1559 changes the fee market to make transaction prices more efficient (helping to alleviate high gas fees!) by burning a variable base fee which changes based on network usage demand rather than using a highest bidder market where miners simply include who pays them the most. This will result in most of the ETH being paid in transaction fees being burned. As of late, the amount which would be burned if EIP-1559 was in Ethereum right now would make ETH a deflationary asset!

Layer 2 Scaling

In the mean time while we are waiting for ETH 2.0, layer 2 scaling is here. Right now, projects such as Deversifi or Loopring utilise rollups to scale to thousands of tx/s on their decentralised exchange platforms or HoneySwap which uses xDai to offer a more scalable alternative to UniSwap. Speaking of which, big DeFi players like UniSwap and Synthetix are actively looking into using optimistic rollups to scale while maintaining composability between DeFi platforms. The most bullish thing about L2 scaling is all of the variety of options. Here’s a non exhaustive list of Ethereum L2 scaling solutions: - Aztec protocol (L2 scaling + privacy!) - ZKSync - Loopring - Raiden - Arbitrum Rollups - xDai - OMGNetwork - Matic - FuelLabs - Starkware - Optimism - Celer Network - + Many more

DeFi and Composability

If you’re reading this, I am sure you are aware of the phenomena which is Decentralised Finance (DeFi or more accurately, open finance). Ethereum is the first platform to offer permissionless and immutable financial services which when interacting with each other, lead to unprecedented composability and innovation in financial applications. A whole new world of possibilities are opening up thanks to this composability as it allows anyone to take existing pieces of open source code from other DeFi projects, put them together like lego pieces (hence the term money legos) and create something the world has never seen before. None of this was possible before Ethereum because typically financial services are heavily regulated and FinTech is usually proprietary software, so you don’t have any open source lego bricks to build off and you have to build everything you need from scratch. That is if what you want to do is even legal for a centralised institution!
Oh, and if you think that DeFi was just a fad and the bubble has popped, guess again! Total value locked in DeFi is currently at an all time high. Don’t believe me? Find out for yourself on the DeFi Pulse website.

NFTs and tokeniation

NFTs or “Non-Fungible Tokens” - despite the name which may confuse a layman - are a basic concept. They are unique tokens with their own unique attributes. This allows you to create digital art, human readable names for your ETH address (see ENS names and unstoppable domains), breedable virtual collectible creatures like crypto kitties, ownable in game assets like Gods Unchained cards or best of all in my opinion, tokenised ownership of real world assets which can even be split into pieces (this doesn’t necessarily require an NFT. Fungible tokens can be/are used for some of the following use cases). This could be tokenised ownership of real estate (see RealT), tokenised ownership of stocks, bonds and other financial assets (which by the way makes them tradable 24/7 and divisible unlike through the traditional system) or even tokenised ownership of the future income of a celebrity or athlete (see when NBA player Spencer Dinwiddie tokenized his own NBA contract.)

Institutional Adoption

Ethereum is by far the most widely adopted blockchain by enterprises. Ethereum’s Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) is the largest blockchain-enterprise partnership program and Ethereum is by far the most frequently leveraged blockchain for proof of concepts and innovation in the blockchain space by enterprises. Meanwhile, there are protocols like the Baseline protocol which is a shared framework which allows enterprises to use Ethereum as a common frame of reference and a base settlement layer without having to give up privacy when settling on the public Ethereum mainnet. This framework makes adopting Ethereum much easier for other enterprises.

Institutional Investment

One of Bitcoin’s biggest things it has going for it right now is the growing institutional investment. In case you were wondering, Ethereum has this too! Grayscale offers investment in the cryptocurrency space for financial institutions and their Ethereum fund has already locked up more than 2% of the total supply of ETH. Not only this, but as businesses transact on Ethereum and better understand it, not only will they buy up ETH to pay for their transactions, but they will also realise that much like Bitcoin, Ethereum is a scarce asset. Better yet, a scarce asset which offers yield. As a result, I expect to see companies having ETH holdings become the norm just like how Bitcoin is becoming more widespread on companies’ balance sheets.

The state of global markets

With asset prices in almost every asset class at or near all-time highs and interest rates lower than ever and even negative in some cases, there really aren’t many good opportunities in the traditional financial system right now. Enter crypto - clearly the next evolution of financial services (as I explained in the section on DeFi earlier in this post), with scarce assets built in at the protocol layer, buying BTC or ETH is a lot like buying shares in TCP/IP in 1990 (that is if the underlying protocols of the internet could be invested in which they couldn’t). Best of all, major cryptos are down from their all-time highs anywhere between 35% for BTC or 70% for ETH and much more for many altcoins. This means that they can significantly appreciate in value before entering uncharted, speculative bubble territory.
While of course we could fall dramatically at any moment in the current macro financial conditions, as a longer term play, crypto is very alluring. The existing financial system has shown that it is in dire need of replacing and the potential replacement has started rearing its head in the form of crypto and DeFi.

Improvements in user onboarding and abstracting away complexity

Ethereum has started making huge leaps forward in terms of usability for the end user. We now have ENS names and unstoppable domains which allow you to send ETH to yournamehere.ETH or TrickyTroll.crypto (I don’t actually have that domain, that’s just an example). No longer do you have to check every character of your ugly hexadecimal 0x43AB96D… ETH address to ensure you’re sending your ETH to the right person. We also have smart contract wallets like Argent wallet or the Gnosis safe. These allow for users to access their wallets and interact with DeFi self-custodially from an app on their phone without having to record a private key or recovery phrase. Instead, they offer social recovery and their UI is straight forward enough for anyone who uses a smart phone to understand. Finally, for the more experienced users, DApps like Uniswap have pretty, super easy to use graphical user interfaces and can be used by anyone who knows how to run and use a browser extension like Metamask.

The lack of an obvious #1 ETH killer

One of Ethereum’s biggest threats is for it to be overthrown by a so-called “Ethereum killer” blockchain which claims to do everything Ethereum can do and sometimes more. While there are competitors which are each formidable to a certain extent such as Polkadot, Cardano and EOS, each have their own weaknesses. For example, Polkadot and Cardano are not fully operational yet and EOS is much more centralised than Ethereum. As a result, none of these competitors have any significant network effects just yet relative to the behemoth which is Ethereum. This doesn’t mean that these projects aren’t a threat. In fact, I am sure that projects like Polkadot (which is more focused on complimenting Ethereum than killing it) will take a slice out of Ethereum’s pie. However, I am still very confident that Ethereum will remain on top due to the lack of a clear number 2 smart contract platform. Since none of these ETH killers stands out as the second place smart contract platform, it makes it much harder for one project to create a network effect which even begins to threaten Ethereum’s dominance. This leads me onto my next reason - network effects.

Network effects

This is another topic which I made a previous post on. The network effect is why Bitcoin is still the number one cryptocurrency and by such a long way. Bitcoin is not the most technologically advanced cryptocurrency. However, it has the most widespread name recognition and the most adoption in most metrics (ETH beats in in some metrics these days). The network effect is also why most people use Zoom and Facebook messengeWhatsApp despite the existence of free, private, end to end encrypted alternatives which have all the same features (Jitsi for the zoom alternative and Signal for the private messenger app. I highly recommend both. Let’s get their network effects going!). It is the same for Bitcoin. People don’t want to have to learn about or set up a wallet for alternative options. People like what is familiar and what other people use. Nobody wants to be “that guy” who makes you download yet another app and account you have to remember the password/private key for. In the same way, Enterprises don’t want to have to create a bridge between their existing systems and a dozen different blockchains. Developers don’t want to have to create DeFi money legos from scratch on a new chain if they can just plug in to existing services like Uniswap. Likewise, users don’t want to have to download another browser extension to use DApps on another chain if they already use Ethereum. I know personally I have refrained from investing in altcoins because I would have to install another app on my hardware wallet or remember another recovery phrase.
Overthrowing Ethereum’s network effect is one hell of a big task these days. Time is running out for the ETH killers.

Ethereum is the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform

Ethereum is also arguably the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform (except for maybe Ethereum Classic on the neutrality part). Unlike some smart contract platforms, you can’t round up everyone at the Ethereum Foundation or any select group of people and expect to be able to stop the network. Not only this, but the Ethereum foundation doesn’t have the ability to print more ETH or push through changes as they wish like some people would lead you on to believe. The community would reject detrimental EIPs and hard fork. Ever since the DAO hack, the Ethereum community has made it clear that it will not accept EIPs which attempt to roll back the chain even to recover hacked funds (see EIP-999).
Even if governments around the world wanted to censor the Ethereum blockchain, under ETH 2.0’s proof of stake, it would be incredibly costly and would require a double digit percentage of the total ETH supply, much of which would be slashed (meaning they would lose it) as punishment for running dishonest validator nodes. This means that unlike with proof of work where a 51% attacker can keep attacking the network, under proof of stake, an attacker can only perform the attack a couple of times before they lose all of their ETH. This makes attacks much less financially viable than it is on proof of work chains. Network security is much more than what I laid out above and I am far from an expert but the improved resistance to 51% attacks which PoS provides is significant.
Finally, with the US dollar looking like it will lose its reserve currency status and the existing wire transfer system being outdated, superpowers like China won’t want to use US systems and the US won’t want to use a Chinese system. Enter Ethereum, the provably neutral settlement layer where the USA and China don’t have to trust each other or each other’s banks because they can trust Ethereum. While it may sound like a long shot, it does make sense if Ethereum hits a multi-trillion dollar market cap that it is the most secure and neutral way to transfer value between these adversaries. Not to mention if much of the world’s commerce were to be settled in the same place - on Ethereum - then it would make sense for governments to settle on the same platform.

ETH distribution is decentralised

Thanks to over 5 years of proof of work - a system where miners have to sell newly minted ETH to pay for electricity costs - newly mined ETH has found its way into the hands of everyday people who buy ETH off miners selling on exchnages. As pointed out by u/AdamSC1 in his analysis of the top 10K ETH addresses (I highly recommend reading this if you haven’t already), the distribution of ETH is actually slightly more decentralised than Bitcoin with the top 10,000 ETH wallets holding 56.70% of ETH supply compared to the top 10,000 Bitcoin wallets which hold 57.44% of the Bitcoin supply. This decentralised distribution means that the introduction of staking won’t centralise ETH in the hands of a few wallets who could then control the network. This is an advantage for ETH which many proof of stake ETH killers will never have as they never used PoW to distribute funds widely throughout the community and these ETH killers often did funding rounds giving large numbers of tokens to VC investors.

The community

Finally, while I may be biased, I think that Ethereum has the friendliest community. Anecdotally, I find that the Ethereum developer community is full of forward thinking people who want to make the world a better place and build a better future, many of whom are altruistic and don’t always act in their best interests. Compare this to the much more conservative, “at least we’re safe while the world burns” attitude which many Bitcoiners have. I don’t want to generalise too much here as the Bitcoin community is great too and there are some wonderful people there. But the difference is clear if you compare the daily discussion of Bitcoin to the incredibly helpful and welcoming daily discussion of EthFinance who will happily answer your noob questions without calling you an idiot and telling you to do you own research (there are plenty more examples in any of the daily threads). Or the very helpful folks over at EthStaker who will go out of their way to help you set up an ETH 2.0 staking node on the testnets (Shoutout to u/superphiz who does a lot of work over in that sub!). Don’t believe me? Head over to those subs and see for yourself.
Please don’t hate on me if you disagree about which project has the best community, it is just my very biased personal opinion and I respect your opinion if you disagree! :)

TL;DR:

submitted by Tricky_Troll to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

A Detailed Summary of Every Single Reason Why I am Bullish on ETH.

The following will be a list of the many reasons why I hold and am extremely bullish on ETH.

This is an extremely long post. If you just want the hopium without the detail, read the TL;DR at the bottom.

ETH 2.0

As we all know, ETH 2.0 phase 0 is right around the corner. This will lock up ETH and stakers will earn interest on their ETH in return for securing the network. Next comes phase 1 where the ETH 2 shards are introduced, shards are essentially parallel blockchains which are each responsible for a different part of Ethereum’s workload, think of it like a multi-core processor vs a single core processor. During phase 1, these shards will only act as data availability layers and won’t actually process transactions yet. However, their data can be utilised by the L2 scaling solution, rollups, increasing Ethereum’s throughput in transactions per second up to 100,000 TPS.
After phase 1 comes phase 1.5 which will move the ETH 1.0 chain into an ETH 2 shard and Ethereum will be fully secured by proof of stake. This means that ETH issuance will drop from around 5% per year to less than 1% and with EIP-1559, ETH might become a deflationary asset, but more on that later.
Finally, with ETH 2.0 phase two, each shard will be fully functional chains. With 64 of them, we can expect the base layer of Ethereum to scale around 64x, not including the massive scaling which comes from layer 2 scaling solutions like rollups as previously mentioned.
While the scaling benefits and ETH issuance reduction which comes with ETH 2.0 will be massive, they aren’t the only benefits. We also get benefits such as increased security from PoS compared to PoW, a huge energy efficiency improvement due to the removal of PoW and also the addition of eWASM which will allow contracts to be programmed in a wide range of programming languages, opening the floodgates for millions of web devs who want to be involved in Ethereum but don’t know Ethereum’s programming language, Solidity.

EIP-1559 and ETH scarcity

As I covered in a previous post of mine, ETH doesn’t have a supply cap like Bitcoin. Instead, it has a monetary policy of “minimum viable issuance”, not only is this is a good thing for network security, but with the addition of EIP-1559, it leaves the door open to the possibility of ETH issuance going negative. In short, EIP-1559 changes the fee market to make transaction prices more efficient (helping to alleviate high gas fees!) by burning a variable base fee which changes based on network usage demand rather than using a highest bidder market where miners simply include who pays them the most. This will result in most of the ETH being paid in transaction fees being burned. As of late, the amount which would be burned if EIP-1559 was in Ethereum right now would make ETH a deflationary asset!

Layer 2 Scaling

In the mean time while we are waiting for ETH 2.0, layer 2 scaling is here. Right now, projects such as Deversifi or Loopring utilise rollups to scale to thousands of tx/s on their decentralised exchange platforms or HoneySwap which uses xDai to offer a more scalable alternative to UniSwap. Speaking of which, big DeFi players like UniSwap and Synthetix are actively looking into using optimistic rollups to scale while maintaining composability between DeFi platforms. The most bullish thing about L2 scaling is all of the variety of options. Here’s a non exhaustive list of Ethereum L2 scaling solutions: - Aztec protocol (L2 scaling + privacy!) - ZKSync - Loopring - Raiden - Arbitrum Rollups - xDai - OMGNetwork - Matic - FuelLabs - Starkware - Optimism - Celer Network - + Many more

DeFi and Composability

If you’re reading this, I am sure you are aware of the phenomena which is Decentralised Finance (DeFi or more accurately, open finance). Ethereum is the first platform to offer permissionless and immutable financial services which when interacting with each other, lead to unprecedented composability and innovation in financial applications. A whole new world of possibilities are opening up thanks to this composability as it allows anyone to take existing pieces of open source code from other DeFi projects, put them together like lego pieces (hence the term money legos) and create something the world has never seen before. None of this was possible before Ethereum because typically financial services are heavily regulated and FinTech is usually proprietary software, so you don’t have any open source lego bricks to build off and you have to build everything you need from scratch. That is if what you want to do is even legal for a centralised institution!
Oh, and if you think that DeFi was just a fad and the bubble has popped, guess again! Total value locked in DeFi is currently at an all time high. Don’t believe me? Find out for yourself at: https://defipulse.com

NFTs and tokeniation

NFTs or “Non-Fungible Tokens” - despite the name which may confuse a layman - are a basic concept. They are unique tokens with their own unique attributes. This allows you to create digital art, human readable names for your ETH address (see ENS names and unstoppable domains), breedable virtual collectible creatures like crypto kitties, ownable in game assets like Gods Unchained cards or best of all in my opinion, tokenised ownership of real world assets which can even be split into pieces (this doesn’t necessarily require an NFT. Fungible tokens can be/are used for some of the following use cases). This could be tokenised ownership of real estate (see RealT), tokenised ownership of stocks, bonds and other financial assets (which by the way makes them tradable 24/7 and divisible unlike through the traditional system) or even tokenised ownership of the future income of a celebrity or athlete (see when NBA Star Spencer Dinwiddie Tokenized His Own NBA Contract.

Institutional Adoption

Ethereum is by far the most widely adopted blockchain by enterprises. Ethereum’s Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) is the largest blockchain-enterprise partnership program and Ethereum is by far the most frequently leveraged blockchain for proof of concepts and innovation in the blockchain space by enterprises. Meanwhile, there are protocols like the Baseline protocol which is a shared framework which allows enterprises to use Ethereum as a common frame of reference and a base settlement layer without having to give up privacy when settling on the public Ethereum mainnet. This framework makes adopting Ethereum much easier for other enterprises.

Institutional Investment

One of Bitcoin’s biggest things it has going for it right now is the growing institutional investment. In case you were wondering, Ethereum has this too! Grayscale offers investment in the cryptocurrency space for financial institutions and their Ethereum fund has already locked up more than 2% of the total supply of ETH. Not only this, but as businesses transact on Ethereum and better understand it, not only will they buy up ETH to pay for their transactions, but they will also realise that much like Bitcoin, Ethereum is a scarce asset. Better yet, a scarce asset which offers yield. As a result, I expect to see companies having ETH holdings become the norm just like how Bitcoin is becoming more widespread on companies’ balance sheets.

The state of global markets

With asset prices in almost every asset class at or near all-time highs and interest rates lower than ever and even negative in some cases, there really aren’t many good opportunities in the traditional financial system right now. Enter crypto - clearly the next evolution of financial services (as I explained in the section on DeFi earlier in this post), with scarce assets built in at the protocol layer, buying BTC or ETH is a lot like buying shares in TCP/IP in 1990 (that is if the underlying protocols of the internet could be invested in which they couldn’t). Best of all, major cryptos are down from their all-time highs anywhere between 35% for BTC or 70% for ETH and much more for many altcoins. This means that they can significantly appreciate in value before entering uncharted, speculative bubble territory.
While of course we could fall dramatically at any moment in the current macro financial conditions, as a longer term play, crypto is very alluring. The existing financial system has shown that it is in dire need of replacing and the potential replacement has started rearing its head in the form of crypto and DeFi.

Improvements in user onboarding and abstracting away complexity

Ethereum has started making huge leaps forward in terms of usability for the end user. We now have ENS names and unstoppable domains which allow you to send ETH to yournamehere.ETH or TrickyTroll.crypto (I don’t actually have that domain, that’s just an example). No longer do you have to check every character of your ugly hexadecimal 0x43AB96D… ETH address to ensure you’re sending your ETH to the right person. We also have smart contract wallets like Argent wallet or the Gnosis safe. These allow for users to access their wallets and interact with DeFi self-custodially from an app on their phone without having to record a private key or recovery phrase. Instead, they offer social recovery and their UI is straight forward enough for anyone who uses a smart phone to understand. Finally, for the more experienced users, DApps like Uniswap have pretty, super easy to use graphical user interfaces and can be used by anyone who knows how to run and use a browser extension like Metamask.

The lack of an obvious #1 ETH killer

One of Ethereum’s biggest threats is for it to be overthrown by a so-called “Ethereum killer” blockchain which claims to do everything Ethereum can do and sometimes more. While there are competitors which are each formidable to a certain extent such as Polkadot, Cardano and EOS, each have their own weaknesses. For example, Polkadot and Cardano are not fully operational yet and EOS is much more centralised than Ethereum. As a result, none of these competitors have any significant network effects just yet relative to the behemoth which is Ethereum. This doesn’t mean that these projects aren’t a threat. In fact, I am sure that projects like Polkadot (which is more focused on complimenting Ethereum than killing it) will take a slice out of Ethereum’s pie. However, I am still very confident that Ethereum will remain on top due to the lack of a clear number 2 smart contract platform. Since none of these ETH killers stands out as the second place smart contract platform, it makes it much harder for one project to create a network effect which even begins to threaten Ethereum’s dominance. This leads me onto my next reason - network effects.

Network effects

This is another topic which I made a previous post on. The network effect is why Bitcoin is still the number one cryptocurrency and by such a long way. Bitcoin is not the most technologically advanced cryptocurrency. However, it has the most widespread name recognition and the most adoption in most metrics (ETH beats in in some metrics these days). The network effect is also why most people use Zoom and Facebook messengeWhatsApp despite the existence of free, private, end to end encrypted alternatives which have all the same features (https://meet.jit.si/ for zoom alternative and Signal for the private messenger app. I highly recommend both. Let’s get their network effects going!). It is the same for Bitcoin. People don’t want to have to learn about or set up a wallet for alternative options. People like what is familiar and what other people use. Nobody wants to be “that guy” who makes you download yet another app and account you have to remember the password/private key for. In the same way, Enterprises don’t want to have to create a bridge between their existing systems and a dozen different blockchains. Developers don’t want to have to create DeFi money legos from scratch on a new chain if they can just plug in to existing services like Uniswap. Likewise, users don’t want to have to download another browser extension to use DApps on another chain if they already use Ethereum. I know personally I have refrained from investing in altcoins because I would have to install another app on my hardware wallet or remember another recovery phrase.
Overthrowing Ethereum’s network effect is one hell of a big task these days. Time is running out for the ETH killers.

Ethereum is the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform

Ethereum is also arguably the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform (except for maybe Ethereum Classic on the neutrality part). Unlike some smart contract platforms, you can’t round up everyone at the Ethereum Foundation or any select group of people and expect to be able to stop the network. Not only this, but the Ethereum foundation doesn’t have the ability to print more ETH or push through changes as they wish like some people would lead you on to believe. The community would reject detrimental EIPs and hard fork. Ever since the DAO hack, the Ethereum community has made it clear that it will not accept EIPs which attempt to roll back the chain even to recover hacked funds (see EIP-999).
Even if governments around the world wanted to censor the Ethereum blockchain, under ETH 2.0’s proof of stake, it would be incredibly costly and would require a double digit percentage of the total ETH supply, much of which would be slashed (meaning they would lose it) as punishment for running dishonest validator nodes. This means that unlike with proof of work where a 51% attacker can keep attacking the network, under proof of stake, an attacker can only perform the attack a couple of times before they lose all of their ETH. This makes attacks much less financially viable than it is on proof of work chains. Network security is much more than what I laid out above and I am far from an expert but the improved resistance to 51% attacks which PoS provides is significant.
Finally, with the US dollar looking like it will lose its reserve currency status and the existing wire transfer system being outdated, superpowers like China won’t want to use US systems and the US won’t want to use a Chinese system. Enter Ethereum, the provably neutral settlement layer where the USA and China don’t have to trust each other or each other’s banks because they can trust Ethereum. While it may sound like a long shot, it does make sense if Ethereum hits a multi-trillion dollar market cap that it is the most secure and neutral way to transfer value between these adversaries. Not to mention if much of the world’s commerce were to be settled in the same place - on Ethereum - then it would make sense for governments to settle on the same platform.

ETH distribution is decentralised

Thanks to over 5 years of proof of work - a system where miners have to sell newly minted ETH to pay for electricity costs - newly mined ETH has found its way into the hands of everyday people who buy ETH off miners selling on exchnages. As pointed out by u/AdamSC1 in his analysis of the top 10K ETH addresses (I highly recommend reading this if you haven’t already), the distribution of ETH is actually slightly more decentralised than Bitcoin with the top 10,000 ETH wallets holding 56.70% of ETH supply compared to the top 10,000 Bitcoin wallets which hold 57.44% of the Bitcoin supply. This decentralised distribution means that the introduction of staking won’t centralise ETH in the hands of a few wallets who could then control the network. This is an advantage for ETH which many proof of stake ETH killers will never have as they never used PoW to distribute funds widely throughout the community and these ETH killers often did funding rounds giving large numbers of tokens to VC investors.

The community

Finally, while I may be biased, I think that Ethereum has the friendliest community. Anecdotally, I find that the Ethereum developer community is full of forward thinking people who want to make the world a better place and build a better future, many of whom are altruistic and don’t always act in their best interests. Compare this to the much more conservative, “at least we’re safe while the world burns” attitude which many Bitcoiners have. I don’t want to generalise too much here as the Bitcoin community is great too and there are some wonderful people there. But the difference is clear if you compare the daily discussion of Bitcoin to the incredibly helpful and welcoming daily discussion of EthFinance who will happily answer your noob questions without calling you an idiot and telling you to do you own research (there are plenty more examples in any of the daily threads). Or the very helpful folks over at EthStaker who will go out of their way to help you set up an ETH 2.0 staking node on the testnets (Shoutout to u/superphiz who does a lot of work over in that sub!). Don’t believe me? Head over to those subs and see for yourself.
Please don’t hate on me if you disagree about which project has the best community, it is just my very biased personal opinion and I respect your opinion if you disagree! :)

TL;DR:

submitted by Tricky_Troll to ethtrader [link] [comments]

A detailed summary of every reason why I am bullish on ETH.

The following will be a list of the many reasons why I hold and am extremely bullish on ETH.

This is an extremely long post. If you just want the hopium without the detail, read the TL;DR at the bottom.

ETH 2.0

As we all know, ETH 2.0 phase 0 is right around the corner. This will lock up ETH and stakers will earn interest on their ETH in return for securing the network. Next comes phase 1 where the ETH 2 shards are introduced, shards are essentially parallel blockchains which are each responsible for a different part of Ethereum’s workload, think of it like a multi-core processor vs a single core processor. During phase 1, these shards will only act as data availability layers and won’t actually process transactions yet. However, their data can be utilised by the L2 scaling solution, rollups, increasing Ethereum’s throughput in transactions per second up to 100,000 TPS.
After phase 1 comes phase 1.5 which will move the ETH 1.0 chain into an ETH 2 shard and Ethereum will be fully secured by proof of stake. This means that ETH issuance will drop from around 5% per year to less than 1% and with EIP-1559, ETH might become a deflationary asset, but more on that later.
Finally, with ETH 2.0 phase two, each shard will be fully functional chains. With 64 of them, we can expect the base layer of Ethereum to scale around 64x, not including the massive scaling which comes from layer 2 scaling solutions like rollups as previously mentioned.
While the scaling benefits and ETH issuance reduction which comes with ETH 2.0 will be massive, they aren’t the only benefits. We also get benefits such as increased security from PoS compared to PoW, a huge energy efficiency improvement due to the removal of PoW and also the addition of eWASM which will allow contracts to be programmed in a wide range of programming languages, opening the floodgates for millions of web devs who want to be involved in Ethereum but don’t know Ethereum’s programming language, Solidity.

EIP-1559 and ETH scarcity

As I covered in a previous post of mine, ETH doesn’t have a supply cap like Bitcoin. Instead, it has a monetary policy of “minimum viable issuance”, not only is this is a good thing for network security, but with the addition of EIP-1559, it leaves the door open to the possibility of ETH issuance going negative. In short, EIP-1559 changes the fee market to make transaction prices more efficient (helping to alleviate high gas fees!) by burning a variable base fee which changes based on network usage demand rather than using a highest bidder market where miners simply include who pays them the most. This will result in most of the ETH being paid in transaction fees being burned. As of late, the amount which would be burned if EIP-1559 was in Ethereum right now would make ETH a deflationary asset!

Layer 2 Scaling

In the mean time while we are waiting for ETH 2.0, layer 2 scaling is here. Right now, projects such as Deversifi or Loopring utilise rollups to scale to thousands of tx/s on their decentralised exchange platforms or HoneySwap which uses xDai to offer a more scalable alternative to UniSwap. Speaking of which, big DeFi players like UniSwap and Synthetix are actively looking into using optimistic rollups to scale while maintaining composability between DeFi platforms. The most bullish thing about L2 scaling is all of the variety of options. Here’s a non exhaustive list of Ethereum L2 scaling solutions: - Aztec protocol (L2 scaling + privacy!) - ZKSync - Loopring - Raiden - Arbitrum Rollups - xDai - OMGNetwork - Matic - FuelLabs - Starkware - Optimism - Celer Network - + Many more

DeFi and Composability

If you’re reading this, I am sure you are aware of the phenomena which is Decentralised Finance (DeFi or more accurately, open finance). Ethereum is the first platform to offer permissionless and immutable financial services which when interacting with each other, lead to unprecedented composability and innovation in financial applications. A whole new world of possibilities are opening up thanks to this composability as it allows anyone to take existing pieces of open source code from other DeFi projects, put them together like lego pieces (hence the term money legos) and create something the world has never seen before. None of this was possible before Ethereum because typically financial services are heavily regulated and FinTech is usually proprietary software, so you don’t have any open source lego bricks to build off and you have to build everything you need from scratch. That is if what you want to do is even legal for a centralised institution!
Oh, and if you think that DeFi was just a fad and the bubble has popped, guess again! Total value locked in DeFi is currently at an all time high. Don’t believe me? Find out for yourself at: https://defipulse.com

NFTs and tokeniation

NFTs or “Non-Fungible Tokens” - despite the name which may confuse a layman - are a basic concept. They are unique tokens with their own unique attributes. This allows you to create digital art, human readable names for your ETH address (see ENS names and unstoppable domains), breedable virtual collectible creatures like crypto kitties, ownable in game assets like Gods Unchained cards or best of all in my opinion, tokenised ownership of real world assets which can even be split into pieces (this doesn’t necessarily require an NFT. Fungible tokens can be/are used for some of the following use cases). This could be tokenised ownership of real estate (see RealT), tokenised ownership of stocks, bonds and other financial assets (which by the way makes them tradable 24/7 and divisible unlike through the traditional system) or even tokenised ownership of the future income of a celebrity or athlete (see when NBA Star Spencer Dinwiddie Tokenized His Own NBA Contract.

Institutional Adoption

Ethereum is by far the most widely adopted blockchain by enterprises. Ethereum’s Enterprise Ethereum Alliance (EEA) is the largest blockchain-enterprise partnership program and Ethereum is by far the most frequently leveraged blockchain for proof of concepts and innovation in the blockchain space by enterprises. Meanwhile, there are protocols like the Baseline protocol which is a shared framework which allows enterprises to use Ethereum as a common frame of reference and a base settlement layer without having to give up privacy when settling on the public Ethereum mainnet. This framework makes adopting Ethereum much easier for other enterprises.

Institutional Investment

One of Bitcoin’s biggest things it has going for it right now is the growing institutional investment. In case you were wondering, Ethereum has this too! Grayscale offers investment in the cryptocurrency space for financial institutions and their Ethereum fund has already locked up more than 2% of the total supply of ETH. Not only this, but as businesses transact on Ethereum and better understand it, not only will they buy up ETH to pay for their transactions, but they will also realise that much like Bitcoin, Ethereum is a scarce asset. Better yet, a scarce asset which offers yield. As a result, I expect to see companies having ETH holdings become the norm just like how Bitcoin is becoming more widespread on companies’ balance sheets.

The state of global markets

With asset prices in almost every asset class at or near all-time highs and interest rates lower than ever and even negative in some cases, there really aren’t many good opportunities in the traditional financial system right now. Enter crypto - clearly the next evolution of financial services (as I explained in the section on DeFi earlier in this post), with scarce assets built in at the protocol layer, buying BTC or ETH is a lot like buying shares in TCP/IP in 1990 (that is if the underlying protocols of the internet could be invested in which they couldn’t). Best of all, major cryptos are down from their all-time highs anywhere between 35% for BTC or 70% for ETH and much more for many altcoins. This means that they can significantly appreciate in value before entering uncharted, speculative bubble territory.
While of course we could fall dramatically at any moment in the current macro financial conditions, as a longer term play, crypto is very alluring. The existing financial system has shown that it is in dire need of replacing and the potential replacement has started rearing its head in the form of crypto and DeFi.

Improvements in user onboarding and abstracting away complexity

Ethereum has started making huge leaps forward in terms of usability for the end user. We now have ENS names and unstoppable domains which allow you to send ETH to yournamehere.ETH or TrickyTroll.crypto (I don’t actually have that domain, that’s just an example). No longer do you have to check every character of your ugly hexadecimal 0x43AB96D… ETH address to ensure you’re sending your ETH to the right person. We also have smart contract wallets like Argent wallet or the Gnosis safe. These allow for users to access their wallets and interact with DeFi self-custodially from an app on their phone without having to record a private key or recovery phrase. Instead, they offer social recovery and their UI is straight forward enough for anyone who uses a smart phone to understand. Finally, for the more experienced users, DApps like Uniswap have pretty, super easy to use graphical user interfaces and can be used by anyone who knows how to run and use a browser extension like Metamask.

The lack of an obvious #1 ETH killer

One of Ethereum’s biggest threats is for it to be overthrown by a so-called “Ethereum killer” blockchain which claims to do everything Ethereum can do and sometimes more. While there are competitors which are each formidable to a certain extent such as Polkadot, Cardano and EOS, each have their own weaknesses. For example, Polkadot and Cardano are not fully operational yet and EOS is much more centralised than Ethereum. As a result, none of these competitors have any significant network effects just yet relative to the behemoth which is Ethereum. This doesn’t mean that these projects aren’t a threat. In fact, I am sure that projects like Polkadot (which is more focused on complimenting Ethereum than killing it) will take a slice out of Ethereum’s pie. However, I am still very confident that Ethereum will remain on top due to the lack of a clear number 2 smart contract platform. Since none of these ETH killers stands out as the second place smart contract platform, it makes it much harder for one project to create a network effect which even begins to threaten Ethereum’s dominance. This leads me onto my next reason - network effects.

Network effects

This is another topic which I made a previous post on. The network effect is why Bitcoin is still the number one cryptocurrency and by such a long way. Bitcoin is not the most technologically advanced cryptocurrency. However, it has the most widespread name recognition and the most adoption in most metrics (ETH beats in in some metrics these days). The network effect is also why most people use Zoom and Facebook messengeWhatsApp despite the existence of free, private, end to end encrypted alternatives which have all the same features (https://meet.jit.si/ for zoom alternative and Signal for the private messenger app. I highly recommend both. Let’s get their network effects going!). It is the same for Bitcoin. People don’t want to have to learn about or set up a wallet for alternative options. People like what is familiar and what other people use. Nobody wants to be “that guy” who makes you download yet another app and account you have to remember the password/private key for. In the same way, Enterprises don’t want to have to create a bridge between their existing systems and a dozen different blockchains. Developers don’t want to have to create DeFi money legos from scratch on a new chain if they can just plug in to existing services like Uniswap. Likewise, users don’t want to have to download another browser extension to use DApps on another chain if they already use Ethereum. I know personally I have refrained from investing in altcoins because I would have to install another app on my hardware wallet or remember another recovery phrase.
Overthrowing Ethereum’s network effect is one hell of a big task these days. Time is running out for the ETH killers.

Ethereum is the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform

Ethereum is also arguably the most decentralised and provably neutral smart contract platform (except for maybe Ethereum Classic on the neutrality part). Unlike some smart contract platforms, you can’t round up everyone at the Ethereum Foundation or any select group of people and expect to be able to stop the network. Not only this, but the Ethereum foundation doesn’t have the ability to print more ETH or push through changes as they wish like some people would lead you on to believe. The community would reject detrimental EIPs and hard fork. Ever since the DAO hack, the Ethereum community has made it clear that it will not accept EIPs which attempt to roll back the chain even to recover hacked funds (see EIP-999).
Even if governments around the world wanted to censor the Ethereum blockchain, under ETH 2.0’s proof of stake, it would be incredibly costly and would require a double digit percentage of the total ETH supply, much of which would be slashed (meaning they would lose it) as punishment for running dishonest validator nodes. This means that unlike with proof of work where a 51% attacker can keep attacking the network, under proof of stake, an attacker can only perform the attack a couple of times before they lose all of their ETH. This makes attacks much less financially viable than it is on proof of work chains. Network security is much more than what I laid out above and I am far from an expert but the improved resistance to 51% attacks which PoS provides is significant.
Finally, with the US dollar looking like it will lose its reserve currency status and the existing wire transfer system being outdated, superpowers like China won’t want to use US systems and the US won’t want to use a Chinese system. Enter Ethereum, the provably neutral settlement layer where the USA and China don’t have to trust each other or each other’s banks because they can trust Ethereum. While it may sound like a long shot, it does make sense if Ethereum hits a multi-trillion dollar market cap that it is the most secure and neutral way to transfer value between these adversaries. Not to mention if much of the world’s commerce were to be settled in the same place - on Ethereum - then it would make sense for governments to settle on the same platform.

ETH distribution is decentralised

Thanks to over 5 years of proof of work - a system where miners have to sell newly minted ETH to pay for electricity costs - newly mined ETH has found its way into the hands of everyday people who buy ETH off miners selling on exchnages. As pointed out by u/AdamSC1 in his analysis of the top 10K ETH addresses (I highly recommend reading this if you haven’t already), the distribution of ETH is actually slightly more decentralised than Bitcoin with the top 10,000 ETH wallets holding 56.70% of ETH supply compared to the top 10,000 Bitcoin wallets which hold 57.44% of the Bitcoin supply. This decentralised distribution means that the introduction of staking won’t centralise ETH in the hands of a few wallets who could then control the network. This is an advantage for ETH which many proof of stake ETH killers will never have as they never used PoW to distribute funds widely throughout the community and these ETH killers often did funding rounds giving large numbers of tokens to VC investors.

The community

Finally, while I may be biased, I think that Ethereum has the friendliest community. Anecdotally, I find that the Ethereum developer community is full of forward thinking people who want to make the world a better place and build a better future, many of whom are altruistic and don’t always act in their best interests. Compare this to the much more conservative, “at least we’re safe while the world burns” attitude which many Bitcoiners have. I don’t want to generalise too much here as the Bitcoin community is great too and there are some wonderful people there. But the difference is clear if you compare the daily discussion of Bitcoin to the incredibly helpful and welcoming daily discussion of EthFinance who will happily answer your noob questions without calling you an idiot and telling you to do you own research (there are plenty more examples in any of the daily threads). Or the very helpful folks over at EthStaker who will go out of their way to help you set up an ETH 2.0 staking node on the testnets (Shoutout to u/superphiz who does a lot of work over in that sub!). Don’t believe me? Head over to those subs and see for yourself.
Please don’t hate on me if you disagree about which project has the best community, it is just my very biased personal opinion and I respect your opinion if you disagree! :)

TL;DR:

submitted by Tricky_Troll to ethfinance [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Farming, Basic Arithmetic, and you

I have written this guide to dispel a common misconception I hear from this community - that putting more than one Graphics Card in your Bitcoin Farm is a great idea.
TLDR: The FIRST graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 20 hours. Every additional graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 333.33 hours. This information is misstated on the wiki and in many videos I've seen.
More Complicated Maths TLDR from u/Mekhazzio :
TLDR: The bitcoin farm has a base production rate that's much higher than the rate added by each additional graphics cards. So when investing, you shouldn't be looking at how fast the whole farm pays itself off, but how much time it takes your N>1 graphics cards to each pay for themselves, because otherwise you could have just been pocketing the pure profit from the base production rate the whole time.
At current therapist/flea-FiR values:
That is to say, adding a GPU to an already-running farm takes three weeks before you've stopped losing money on that GPU.

A pretty simple formula is utilized to determine Bitcoin Farming output. The payback period for your first graphics card is around 3 days. For each additional graphics card that you put in the payback period is over 20 days. The reason that this has confused so many people is that they credit the production from Graphics Card 1 to the payback period for the rest of the Graphics Cards.
Caveat 1: Escape from Tarkov is a video game and, at least for us players, not a business. Many video game players are completionists, and I will not begrudge anyone who wants to max out every single part of their hideout because it will feel like an achievement. This guide discusses the impact of bitcoin farming on your PMC's wallet. If you find utility in maxing out the bitcoin farm for the feeling of completion then you should do it and probably just close this guide and not worry about it.
Caveat 2: This guide will not address people who hatchet run or pistol run to put graphics cards in their secure container that will usually end up being non-FIR. There are too many variables (spawn rate, survival rate, replacement value of just doing normal Tarkov raids instead of hatchet runs) to do a decent analysis. If you end up with non-FIR graphics cards you should put them in your Bitcoin Farm.
Analysis:
The formula for bitcoin generation is as follows:
Let's simplify some unnecessary constants and make this look more like a normal mathematical function. All we have to do is multiply (1/49) * (0.15) to get this, which is equivalent and much easier to understand:
Now, let's get some ground rules for investment:
Caveat 3: Prices may change, blah blah blah, unless the IRL bitcoin market crashes the conclusions from this guide will still be accurate for the most part.
I will also note that I'm not going to include the cost for fuel needed for production. Because you can craft expeditionary fuel into mag boxes, as well as do other crafts on your workbench and med station while you have the power on, this cost is negligible. Furthermore, since my thesis is that putting more graphics cards in is not worth it, the fact is that I can prove this mathematically without even accounting for the entire cost category of fuel only strengthens my argument.
Using these assumed prices, let's take a look at some different cases.
Case 1:
Building a Bitcoin Generator and putting a single graphics card in.
To calculate cost, we add the cost of building the empty generator (300k) to the single graphics card (250k) to get 550k rouble investment.
Lets calculate revenue using our formula before:BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (1 Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (0)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05
So we're generating 5% of a bitcoin every hour which means we'll get a bitcoin from our farm every 20 hours.
So, every 20 hours we are generating a product worth ~150k. Since we invested ~550k we need to sell:
550k investment / 150k roubles per bitcoin = 3.66 physical bitcoins in order to recoup our investment
Since we can't harvest bitcoins until they are full, we actually need to wait until we get 4 bitcoins at which point we'll be making a slight profit. Generating 4 bitcoins will take 4 bitcoins * 20 hours per bitcoin = 80 hours or a little more than 3 days.
Case 2:
Adding a second graphics card to our bitcoin farm.
Now, as discussed above I'm not worried about non-FIR graphics cards that you hatchet ran to find. If you have an FIR graphics card then you can sell it on the flea market for the 250k price that I'm using as an assumption above.
This concept is called opportunity cost and if you don't understand it I will troll you in the comments: Putting an FIR graphics card into your bitcoin farm is the same as purchasing one off of the flea market and putting it in your bitcoin farm because you had the opportunity to just sell your FIR graphics card for the same price that you can buy it.
With that out of the way, let's do some math on our 2 graphics card bitcoin farm:
BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * (2 Graphics Cards - 1)BTC Generated per Hour = 0.05 + 0.003 * 1BTC Generated per Hour = 0.053
So, for the cost of 250k roubles we have increased our bitcoin per hour generation by 0.003.
The first graphics card that we added to our bitcoin farm generates us one bitcoin every 20 hours, as discussed above.
The second graphics card that we added to our bitcoin farm generates 0.003 bitcoins per hour. To calculate how many hours this takes to get 1 bitcoin we do the math of 1 / 0.003 = 333.33 hours. 333.33 hours / 24 hours per day is 13.88 or roughly 14 days.
In order to recoup our investment from the 250k roubles we used to get our second graphics card we divide 250k roubles invested by 150k roubles per bitcoin = 1.66 bitcoins. We generate one bitcoin every 14 days, so we can multiply 14 days * 1.66 bitcoins = 23 days.
This math will hold true for every additional graphics card because the function is linear.
Thus, the payback period for your 250k investment in adding a graphics card past the first one to your bitcoin farm is 23 days.
To reiterate: The FIRST graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 20 hours. Every additional graphics card you put in your bitcoin farm generates a bitcoin every 333.33 hours.
submitted by Death4Chairman20x70 to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

Cultural Exchange between /r/Lebanon and /r/berlin

Welcome to the Cultural Exchange between /Lebanon and /berlin/
Courtesy of our friends over at /berlin/ we are pleased to host our end of the cultural exchange between the two subreddits.
The purpose of this event is to allow people from two different regions to get and share knowledge about their respective cultures, daily life, history and curiosities.

General guidelines


Quick introduction about Lebanon

Quick explanation of what is happening in Lebanon (Before the explosion): https://imgur.com/a/Ixo3v8S
Introduction
Lebanon is a tiny country in the middle east. It's bordered by Syria from the north and east, Israel from the south, and the Mediterranean Sea from the west. Syria has been in a deadly civil war since 2012. Lebanon and Israel are officially "at war" since the inception of Israel, though currently there isn't any war going on, and the last real war between the two countries happened in 2006 and lasted only 30 days.
Lebanon went into a long and deadly civil war in the 70s and 80s. It only ended when the war lords sat together and decided that instead of attempting to kill each other, why not become rulers and split the gains. Thus from the early 90s until today Lebanon has been ruled by the same warlords that fought in the civil war. The speaker of the parliament never changed, not even once, and the rest of MPs and politicians just switched ministries and places every few years to present the image of democracy.
Lebanon also has Hizbollah, an organization that is labeled as a terrorist organization by many countries. Hizbollah has more powerful intillegence and military than the Lebanese government itself. The organization has unobstructed powers, for example, it started the 2006 war with Israel without the acceptance of the official Lebanese government.
Lebanese politicians save their billions and billions of dollars in savings in banks across Europe, mainly Switzerland.
Lebanon doesn't have oil, nor a serious construction sector. Lebanon relies on the service sector and tourism to survive, both of which are almost nonexistent at this point. Lebanon has a huge crippling debt. Lebanon's capital, Beirut, was voted the most expensive city to live in in the middle east two years ago. Lebanon's passport is one of the worst passports in the world and doesn't allow you to visit any notable country without a visa.
October 2019 - Political, COVID-19 and Economical Problems
In October 2019, the government approved a law that would increase taxes, and tax the usage of Whatsapp. The Lebanese population attempted a peaceful revolution, the country effectively closed down from October until December. The revolution was successful in forcing the government to resign, but wasn't able to make the president, MPs or speaker of the parliament resign.
Things went to shit after that, unofficial capital control started in October. The bank declared that people can't withdraw money from their savings or current accounts. People weren't allowed to transfer money outside Lebanon or use any credit or debit card internationally. The government started considering a haircut. The currency started to lose value rapidly.
The official rate is currently 1$ = 1,515 LBP while the black market rate is 1$ = 8,500 LBP
The money stuck in the bank is useless, almost frozen because it can't be withdrawn without losing ~65% of it's value and even then, in small quantities.
Add to that COVID-19 is ripping the country. We're having exponential growth in the number of cases right now.
The Explosion
On August 4, 2020 multiple explosions occurred in Beirut Port that destroyed half the city, killed hundreds, with an additional large number of people missing, injured hundreds of thousands of people and made 300,000 people homeless. 80000 children displaced. The explosion was so big that it was heard and felt in Cyprus and Syria. There were reports of damages to properties from the explosions all over Lebanon, not just in Beirut.
The explosion destroyed half of the city including busy hospitals, which ended up causing people to have to deliver or have critical operations using the flash light from the doctors' cellphones.
The explosion killed several foreign nationals including French, German, Canadian, American, and Australian citizens.
This post is made to raise awareness about what happened in Lebanon by sharing the videos of the incident. Please note that those videos are graphic as they show the moment the explosion happened.
Donation Help
Any kind of monetary donation will go a LONG way during these times.
You can donate using your credit card, paypal account, bank transfer or bitcoin donation.
You can find a list of verified and safe NGOs to donate to here: https://www.reddit.com/lebanon/comments/iaakslist_of_lebanese_ngos_that_are_verified_and_safe/
You can check out some of the videos here:
Reddit Links:
submitted by ThePerito to lebanon [link] [comments]

Conflicted On Twitter Heading Into Earnings

Conflicted On Twitter Heading Into Earnings
TL;DR: Twitter has a horrible execution history and negative surprises on the most recent earnings call, but company has real long term value that has yet to be unlocked. The bet here is that TWTR has run up based on pin action from SNAP, but fundamentals and peer comparison cloud the picture.
I read this post calling for a short on Twitter and it became a bit of a WSB ear worm. I generally agreed with OP's assessment, but he was a bit short on DD and most of my thoughts are based on biases against the company's horrible execution/monetization history and a general disdain for Jack Dorsey wanting to move to Africa for a year rather than focusing on the TWO companies that have made him a billionaire.
I thought about it, researched some short term puts (high premium as expected given recent run up into all time high today, earnings Thursday) and basically ATM puts are running $2.76 for $51's expiring Friday or $3.36 if I want to give myself the extra week (ELECTION MADNESS!) for an extra swing at the payoff.
My initial thought is that Twitter has run up with SNAP and PINS after SNAP crushed earnings. I had started to look at PINS for an earnings play but didn't get to it before SNAP sent them all (and FB) off to the races. With that said, Twitter has a history of disappointing and I'm not aware of anything they've done recently to better monetize the site. I also haven't done any DD on them in forever after getting stuck long a few times and having to wait a quarter or so twice for what should have been a short term trade.
So, thanks to OP Justaryns, here's some follow on DD. Now I'm more conflicted.
Financials.
Strong balance sheet. Company had $7.8 Billion cash on hand end of June, adding $1 Billion of that during the first six (crash/shutdown) months of the year. Only $831 Million of current liabilities and total debt is $4.1 Billion. Market Cap is less than 4x book value. No issues here.
Income statement is a bit more hokey. They took a major charge last quarter for a "non-cash tax deferred asset". That messed up a slow but steady growing trendline. How much so? Check the CNBC graphic:

2Q: Whoops
Also during the last quarter, Twitter had a massive hack where some moron tried to use the accounts of famous people to try and sell (Edit; The currency that we doth not speak its name). No word on which autist here did that. The problems continued into the last few weeks, when Twitter had a massive outage that the President blamed cited the Babylon Bee as Biden protection. That's more of a reminder that headline and political risk remains in all communication services stocks, and tomorrow we'll get a better reminder as the CEO's of Twitter, Facebook, and Microsoft testify before a Congress that hates them more than their own voters.
So Twitter has execution problems, political risk, and a CEO that is still trying to decide what he wants to be when he grows up. Yet it's had a massive run up as pin action from SNAP. Does it have further room to run? Chart comparisons suggest it could.

Relative Performance of SNAP, PINS, TWTR, and FB
This is where I get heartburn on the short. Over the past year, PINS and SNAP have had over a 150% return. FB, much more established and with a market cap 20 times that of Twitter, has still given a respectable 46% return. Twitter is up 73%, which is a lot...until you compare it to peers like SNAP and PINS.
Further, analysts are sour on Twitter, with 32 of 41 giving hold or underperform ratings, and a stock price 20% below current prices. I tend to consider them a contra-indicator, in that they move after sentiment does, usually not before.

CNBC analyst summary
So, I'm torn. If Dorsey can demonstrate he has finally decided to execute a business plan and fix the recurring technical/security issues, there's real value to unlock here. Short term....I'm probably willing to take a gamble that he hasn't, and buy a few puts. What say y'all?
Related Positions: 6 FB 275 Nov 20 calls. No positions yet on TWTR.
submitted by One_Eyed_Man_King to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

Making A Living From Bitcoin

If you are like me, then you are probably always looking for new ways to generate income. There are always new opportunities out there to make a quick buck, however, I try and be selective and do extensive research into the opportunities I spot. I have recently become very interested in the opportunities that Bitcoin trading presents. Increasing your streams of passive income through a diverse range of methods can start to add up to a significant amount each month. Here are a few ways to start making money through Bitcoin.
Mining Bitcoin
Essentially mining means using computing power to secure a network to receive Bitcoin rewards. It is the oldest form of earning passive income through Bitcoin as it doesn’t require you to have cryptocurrency holdings. In the early days, this method was a viable solution, however, as the network hash rate increase most miners shifted to using more powerful Graphics Processing Units. Due to the vast increase in competition mining became the playing field of Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs) - electronics that use mining chips tailor-made for this specific purpose. Nowadays setting up and maintaining mining equipment requires substantial investment and technical expertise – but it's worth it if you happen to fit the criteria. Not to mention the cooling costs associated with running a machine powerful enough to mine Bitcoin.
Staking
Staking is a less resource-intensive alternative to mining, involving keeping funds in a suitable wallet and performing various network functions to receive staking rewards (i.e. Bitcoin). Usually, staking involves establishing a staking wallet and simply holding the coins. In other cases, the process will involve a staking pool. Some exchanges will do all this for you – all you have to do it keep your tokens on the exchange and all the technical requirements will be taken care of. This is a great way to increase your Bitcoin holdings with minimal efforts.
Lending
Lending is a completely passive method to earn interest on your Bitcoin holdings. There are several peer-to-peer lending platforms available that enable you to lock up your funds for a period of time to later collect interest payments. The interest rate could either be set for the platform or based on the current market rate. This method is ideal for those looking for long term rewards, however, it is worth noting that locking your funds in a smart contact always carries the risk of bugs.
Finding a Bitcoin Trading Company
For those who are less technically inclined and don’t have a firm grasp of how Bitcoin trading works, there is always the opportunity of finding a company that will trade on your behalf. The issue with this is that there are many seedy companies who claim to do this but then end up ripping you off. In order to have peace of mind, you need to find a Bitcoin trading company that understands the market and is reputable enough. I stumbled across Mirror Trading International, a company that operates out of South Africa. What immediately stood out for me was that they were transparent and professional in their engagements. Daily profits are paid on the days where there are profits recorded. In addition to this, they have made the entire registration and withdrawal process as simple as possible. All you have to do is simply fund your account with the minimum fund value and you can start earning. If you do need to access the funds, then this is a simple process that you have full control of.
I would suggest everyone to do their research and keep an open mind. The thousands of testimonials, along with their members from all across the world is testament that they are a legitimate company that is sustainable.
submitted by DavidDekel2020 to GrowBitcoin [link] [comments]

Meet the YFDAI Team!

Meet the YFDAI Team!

https://preview.redd.it/yq470s2kmcu51.png?width=1280&format=png&auto=webp&s=4c04f1499dca093a4550beb19ae8c7626326959e
Over the course of mere months, the DeFi space has grown to the tune of billions in 2020. While DeFi has earned its title as the next hottest crypto trend, its popularity has shown to be a double-edged sword. Reports of scams and “rug pulls” have volleyed into crypto news outlets, social media, and discussion groups, damaging the reputation of the DeFi space.
DeFi is unique in that the tenets of trust and decentralization has normalized the practice of anonymity to the point where nearly every single DeFi team launches anonymously. While the freedom to create DeFi tools does support the notion that anyone should be able to create an honest financial protocol for the goodwill of the people, the opposite effect often occurs. If the past few months has proven anything, it’s that the normalization of anonymity has acted as both the greatest weapon and the greatest defence for fraudulent actors and dishonest entities. Because of this, DeFi is often seen as a free-for-all minefield as countless exit scams and “rugpulls” have become the norm. Having this as an accepted vice of DeFi shouldn’t mean investors should normalize risk of losses. It should inspire projects to set a higher standard in the DeFi space.
We are excited to announce that the YFDAI team has taken the tenets of decentralized finance and expanded on them. As a DeFi protocol, we champion decentralization and the collective action of the community to pave the road towards true transparency and security for all. After countless hours of legal counseling, we’re proud to announce that we will be among the very few DeFi projects to go public and among the first to set a new precedent for the DeFi space.
Say hello to the YFDAI team.
Meet Pritha Paul (Olivia) — Chief Strategic — Volunteer

https://preview.redd.it/jqqax671lcu51.jpg?width=357&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=66703ab44c96cea71df47178627e586a8d70a1e5
Olivia is both a software engineer and a Businesswoman. Having been an avid fan of blockchain and trader of cryptocurrencies, Olivia felt the need to contribute her expertise to the cryptocurrency space. This desire prompted her to create YFDAI, one of DeFi’s most secure and trusted protocols. Seeing the cryptocurrency space as a professional programmer, Olivia knows the importance of making a clean and secure DeFi protocol.
With the rate of fraudulent projects ascending contemporaneously with the rise of DeFi, Olivia knew it was crucial to have a trusted and well-secured protocol that can guide as an example for other projects to follow. Along with this idea, Olivia felt that for DeFi to reach its highest potential, there needed to be an ecosystem that protects investors and supports DeFi projects looking to bring real value to the space. With this in mind, Olivia came up with YFDAI’s signature SafeSwap and LaunchPad platforms.
Olivia has a number of qualifications and holds a bachelor’s in Computer Applications. Some of her advanced programming languages include: C, C++, JAVA, Python, Oracle.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/pritha-paul-olivia-a576b71b9/
Meet Tapas Paul (Rocky) — Lead Dev — Volunteer

https://preview.redd.it/otog4vkclcu51.jpg?width=357&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c668d0b6ac5573757030a609ed563ee49d734ac7
Doubling as a software developer and website designer, Tapas carries ample experience in web development and design. Having been familiar with cryptocurrencies for years, his initial descent into the space came in the golden year of 2017. Since then, Tapas has been engaged in crypto and felt the need to create a truly honest and secure DeFi platform together with Pritha. Tapas’s vast expertise in web development and blockchain gives YFDAI an edge in becoming one of the top DeFi protocols in the space.
Tapas has a diverse range of tech experience that range from creating web applications and front-end designs for various startups to working as a senior blockchain developer for distributed solidity systems for complicated DAPPs. Since then, Tapas has provided Ethereum and TRON consulting to multiple blockchain startups entering the space.
Some of Tapas expertise and advanced programming languages include- Solidity, Web3 TronWeb, JavaScript, MongoDB, ExpressJS, ReactJS Node.JS React Native, HTML5, CSS3, Distributed Ledger Technology , Ethereum and TRON DAPPs, Authentication systems, Real Time Web Apps.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/tapas-paul-rocky-4609781b2/
Meet Ankit Ruthala (Thore) — Chief Business Development — Volunteer

https://preview.redd.it/0b7vqesglcu51.jpg?width=357&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=f5aaaaf903753cd2373b0bc32d924f8729bbcb41
Thore carries a Bachelor’s in Mechanical Engineering with fundamental engineering and dynamics experience. He has extensive background experience in both engineering and blockchain development. With the ever-increasing level of innovation that is occurring in the blockchain and cryptocurrency space, Thore felt the need to contribute his own knowledge and expertise to the field. Thore’s extensive experience in the field is projected into the YFDAI project with the end-user in mind. Being proficient in both blockchain literacy and technical analyses, Thore understands the cryptocurrency space from both a developer and investor perspective.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/ankit-runthala-752a4785
Meet Wesley — Security Consultant — Volunteer

https://preview.redd.it/d4738ojklcu51.jpg?width=357&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=c98608b8f71087285cf14e7bd8be2d8125c978d6
Wesley specializes in Infrastructure and security management with a background in economics. Having been involved in the cryptocurrency scene for over three years, Wesley has had ample exposure to the world of blockchain and cryptocurrencies. Since 2017, Wesley has worked as an agent for BTC Direct and in Binance community management.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/wesley-thijssen-223813134/
Meet Cristian- Graphic Designer — Volunteer

https://preview.redd.it/nb91hb6qlcu51.jpg?width=357&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=256969502f4223b56a9f615e6445a6340660a68b
Despite his previous work experience as a computer programmer, Cristian found his niche excelling in graphic design and maximizing brand identity. After winning over 400 graphic design competitions, Cristian now works as a dedicated graphic designer. Living by the mantra of “every profession is an act of service”, Cristian’s passion is manifested through his works in design, brand awareness, and customer satisfaction.
https://99designs.com/profiles/oakbrand
Meet Cris Content Writer — Volunteer

https://preview.redd.it/y6fgolqulcu51.jpg?width=357&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=46f981373a8b011cf570bf50ef46b5e87b395c4e
Cris first began his cryptocurrency journey in the summer of 2017. Since then, he has been obsessed with everything cryptocurrency and blockchain related. After being featured on a series of cryptocurrency publications on Medium, Cris found his way into writing and managing a variety of cryptocurrency startups. Cris now continues pursuing his passion in cryptocurrency while balancing life as a university student.
https://www.linkedin.com/m/in/cris-montoya-1738b61b9-Cris/
Meet Christof Waton — Business Development Consultant — Volunteer

https://preview.redd.it/2r3vb6u1mcu51.jpg?width=357&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=ca5a3c009dd7a32211bb2c141c13f6ccddeb04a2
Christof currently holds a bachelor’s in data communication and is currently completing his masters in Digital Currencies. His initial descent into cryptocurrencies came when he first bought Bitcoin in 2014. Since then, Christof has led his professional career in a variety of fields in and out of the crypto space. Within the crypto space, Christof has held positions as chief business development officer for both ExMarkets and CoinMargin. Outside of the crypto space Christof led as a consultant for both Dubai Hills Fund and Verifo, an e-money institution. After years of experience in both the financial and crypto industry, Christof has experienced cryptocurrency through the lens of a professional, investor, and an enthusiast.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/watonchristof/
Meet Philip Dow — Head Advisor — Volunteer

https://preview.redd.it/a7yu2nd5mcu51.jpg?width=357&format=pjpg&auto=webp&s=cd00c47f55530afb4570808168a26d88c3cf7529
Phil operates as a strategic executive with a high-level background in project management, business development, and marketing. Phil first brought his expertise to the cryptocurrency field in 2016. Phil carries a wealth of knowledge as his years in crypto garnered him key connections with a variety of different cryptocurrency partners ranging from, developers, project CEOs, and marketing.
For the past 4 years Phil has brought coverage to a multitude of different blockchain companies, each offering unique expertise and applications in a wide variety of fields.
https://www.linkedin.com/in/philipdow55/
Now that the team identities have been released this dispels the “Elephant in the room”. The fact that the team chose to become non-anon opens up many doors that would otherwise be closed. The specifics of those opportunities will be made clear in the upcoming whitepaper and future announcements.
Even though the names and faces of the founders behind the project have been revealed, please note that there are many people who are working on the YFDAI project on a contractual basis and volunteer basis who have not been included in the disclosure. There are experts and advisors in the fields of business development, economics, law, and other areas vital to any business that play a major role in the success of YFDAI and who share the vision of the founders to clean up the DeFi space and offer a safe, reliable, and secure suite of DeFi products to the public.
While the team behind a crypto project is vital, the ultimate success of any DeFi project relies on the technology, the code, and the community. YFDAI’s technology and code have been designed to be bulletproof in order to maximize the safety and security for the end user. In the not too distant future, YFDAI’s business model envisions the everyday decisions to ultimately be made by you, the community, by way of the DAO as governance is turned over to the token holders.
To ensure we are operating as securely and compliantly as possible YFDAI has been incorporated as a Technology business in Singapore:
Company Name — Tejster Technologies PTE. LTD. Registration No — 202031933C Address — 50,Raffles Place,#37–00,Singapore Land Tower, Singapore (048623)
To finalise the compliance aspect YFDAI is in the process of obtaining full Financial Services regulation by means of receiving compliance and registration in the Republic of Estonia.
This will be a two stage process with an initial Virtual Currency Exchange and E-Wallet licence currently being sought. YDFAI’s legal representatives have moved this to an advanced stage and expect this to be finalized in Q4 2020. It is at this point that the team shall resume their full job titles and the term “Volunteer” will no longer be required.
The licenses will open up a plethora of opportunities which will be fully detailed in our soon to be released whitepaper and will also provide YFDAI with a level of accreditation that will provide users with full peace of mind.
Once YFDAI secures the Financial Services accreditation listed above, YFDAI will have full insurance coverage of the project’s financial holdings and transactions, including project wallets and user funds.
Thank you for your support and we look forward to setting a new standard of self regulation that will revolutionize the DeFI arena and level the playing field for all participants while minimizing the fraud and desecration of the bad actors who have infiltrated the DeFi space.
- YFDAI Team
Visit us on our website and chat with us on Telegram!
Website: https://www.yfdai.finance
Telegram Community: https://t.me/yfdaifinance
Telegram Announcements: https://t.me/yfdai
Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/yfdai-finance
submitted by YFDAIFinance to u/YFDAIFinance [link] [comments]

.12.4 Path Notes Megathread

https://twitter.com/BetaEFT/status/1236020296500621314
Dear Escapers!
We are glad to present you the preliminary patchnotes for the upcoming 0.12.4 patch!
Added:
• Interchange location has been reworked
• Interchange location lighting has been updated
• New interactive objects, new location exfils
• Various problems with culling, physical colliders have been fixed
• New mechanics, overweight. The character receives various debuffs while carrying a certain amount of weight (increased equipment noise, movement speed limits, increased stamina consumption, etc.)
• Fatigue effect debuff has been added, which appears if the character keeps the stamina at a low level for a long time. Energy consumption increases with this effect.
• Now The character's stamina indicator is divided into arms and legs. The arm's stamina is consumed when aiming, throwing grenades and fighting with melee weapons. The legs stamina is consumed during sprinting, jumping, changing body positions, etc. Also, the legs stamina starts to drain when the hand's stamina drops to zero.
• The "trading "flea market", "inventory" buttons have been added to the bottom panel of the interface for quick access.
• New hand grenades based on the VOG-17 and VOG-25 prototypes.
• The resolution of your screen is automatically determined and applied as standard settings, at the first start of the game.
• New weapon mods
New sets of character customization and equipment
• New BEAR top called “Telnik” • New BEAR pants called “Tiger” • New USEC top called “TIER2” • New USEC pants called “Commando” • New SCAV top “Olimpic shirt Russia”
• New body armor, tactical vests, backpack, helmet, active headset
• Grenade case
• New barter loot and new trading schemas requiring this loot
• New hideout crafting schemas
• New quests with new outfits as a reward
Optimization:
• Minor lightning optimizations
• Minor decals optimizations
• Various server stability optimizations
Fixed:
• Fixed a bug in which saving the weapons preset, all inventory, and trading operations could freeze
• Fixed part of inventory display bugs at 2k (or 1440p) screen resolution
• Fixed a bug where AI corpses could disappear during reconnect
• Displaying of notifications while receiving weapons from a SCAV box has been fixed
• Fixed a bug when the production timer might not be updated when the generator ran out of fuel
• Fixed a bug when it was impossible to enter the hideout after transferring graphics cards from the Bitcoin farm
• Fixed a bug when the context menu did not appear on items brought by SCAV
• Fixed a bug when the item could remain unexamined after production
• Fixed a bug when you, with a pistol or melee weapon, press the sprint button twice, the character runs in place
• Now you won’t be kicked to the main menu, after receiving a “the stash is full” error
• Fixed hideout bug which allowed to appear a window for transferring items from the first-person view
• Fixed pop-ups which can appear not in the center of the screen
• A bug while the pop-up with a list of missing items appears beyond the screen
• Fixed a bug which caused errors at the flea market while there are barter offers
• Another various bug fixes and corrections
Changed:
• Stimulants parameters have been adjusted, debuffs became weaker
• The weight of various items has been adjusted
• The flea market is now available from the 15th PMC lvl (was lvl 5)
• Small reflex sights marks were downscaled (aimpoint, romeo, trijicon)
• Accuracy values in weapon characteristics are now displayed in Minutes Of Angle
• We added a weapon name to the standard weapon presets, which they relate to
edit: oof that typo
submitted by SolidAwecelot to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

Please change the bitcoin echonomy (version 0.12 date: 11.22.2019)

*Long Read*
Over the past week I have been watching the bitcoins on the market and with therapist. I have not documented any findings but you can fact check me by going to the bitcoin page on the flea market and also if you own a bitcoin go therapist and see how much she will give you for it. The Actual Post:
So. With the introduction of the bitcoin mining in the hideout there is a constant influx of bitcoins to the market. I dont know if it is good or bad yet but im feeling its going in the direction of bad. Over the past week with more and more players getting their hideout upgraded the market is getting flooded. Every day the price of a bitcoin drops between 4-10k roubles. at the current speed by the end of next week the bitcoin will be worth ~50k roubles. currently sitting at 111k roubles as of this post being written. the usual price has been ~140k. In my opinion and maybe others, I feel like the bitcoin is sort of the holy grail of barter items finds on every map when you find a bitcoin or a tetris that sometimes can pay for your gear if you where to die*1 (except the Labs items like ledX vpx etc). with the price dropping at this speed it is also reducing the cost of high tier items that I dont think should be cheap. I'm not sure how to fix this but maybe a removal of the dynamic prices on bitcoins would fix the problem.
*1 (depending on what kind of gear you are running)
Please give me your input. I'd like to see what other people think about this.
submitted by ImTombstone to EscapefromTarkov [link] [comments]

Mega eTextbooks release thread (part-28)! Find your textbooks here between $5-$25 :)

Please find the list below:
  1. Disease Gene Identification: Methods and Protocols, 2nd Edition: Johanna K. DiStefano
  2. Statistical Aspects of the Microbiological Examination of Foods, 3rd Edition: Basil Jarvis
  3. Revel for Social Problems, 14th Edition: Stanley Eitzen & Maxine Baca Zinn & Kelly Ei Smith
  4. Fundamentals of Human Resource Management: Pearson New International Edition, 3rd Edition: Gary Dessler
  5. Economics Today: The Micro View, 18th Edition: Roger LeRoy Miller
  6. Employment Law for Business, 8th Edition: Dawn Bennett-Alexander & Laura Hartman
  7. Surgical Exposures in Orthopaedics: The Anatomic Approach, 5th Edition: Stanley Hoppenfeld & Piet de Boer & Richard Buckley
  8. Project Management in Construction, 7th Edition: Sidney Levy
  9. Financial and Managerial Accounting, 7th Edition: John Wild & Ken Shaw & Barbara Chiappetta
  10. Handbook of Plant Disease Identification and Management, 1st Edition: Balaji Aglave
  11. Ubuntu Unleashed 2019 Edition: Covering 18.04, 18.10, 19.04, 13th Edition: Matthew Helmke
  12. Handbook of Insulin Therapies, 1st Edition: Winston Crasto & Janet Jarvis & Melanie J. Davies
  13. Python for Programmers: with Big Data and Artificial Intelligence Case Studies, 1st Edition: Paul J. Deitel & Harvey Deitel
  14. Medical Ethics: Accounts of Ground-Breaking Cases, 7th Edition: Gregory Pence
  15. Human Resource Management, 13th Edition: Gary Dessler
  16. The Biology and Therapeutic Application of Mesenchymal Cells, 2 Volume Set, 1st Edition: Kerry Atkinson
  17. Computer Security Fundamentals, 3rd Edition: William Chuck Easttom
  18. Hendee's Radiation Therapy Physics, 4th Edition: Todd Pawlicki & Daniel J. Scanderbeg & George Starkschall
  19. Nutrient Delivery, 1st Edition: Alexandru Grumezescu
  20. Technology Entrepreneurship: Taking Innovation to the Marketplace, 2nd Edition: Thomas N. Duening & Robert A. Hisrich & Michael A. Lechter
  21. Chemistry of Metalloproteins: Problems and Solutions in Bioinorganic Chemistry, 1st Edition: Joseph J. Stephanos & Anthony W. Addison
  22. Mathematical Statistics with Applications in R, 2nd Edition: Kandethody M. Ramachandran & Chris P. Tsokos
  23. Diagnostic Imaging: Genitourinary, 3rd Edition: Mitchell E. Tublin
  24. Comprehensive Management of Arteriovenous Malformations of the Brain and Spine, 1st Edition: Robert F. Spetzler & Douglas S. Kondziolka & Randall T. Higashida & M. Yashar S. Kalani
  25. Digital Design: With an Introduction to the Verilog HDL, 5th Edition: M. Morris R. Mano & Michael D. Ciletti
  26. Plasmids: Biology and Impact in Biotechnology and Discovery, 1st Edition: Marcelo E. Tolmasky & Juan C. Alonso
  27. Consumer Behavior: Buying, Having, and Being, Global Edition, 12th Edition: Michael R. Solomon
  28. Project Management Case Studies, 5th Edition: Harold Kerzner
  29. Medical Phisiology: Principles for Clinical Medicine, 4th Edition: Rodney A. Rhoades & David R. Bell
  30. Essentials of Contemporary Management, 7th Edition: Gareth Jones & Jennifer George
  31. Harmony and Voice Leading, 4th Edition: Thomas E. Benjamin & Michael Horvit & Robert S. Nelson
  32. Principles of Economics, 2nd Edition: Lee Coppock & Dirk Mateer
  33. Oral Microbiology and Immunology, 2nd Edition: Richard J. Lamont & George N. Hajishengallis & Howard F. Jenkinson
  34. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain and Spine, 5th Edition: Scott W. Atlas
  35. Accounting Information Systems: Controls and Processes, 3rd Edition: Leslie Turner & Andrea B. Weickgenannt & Mary Kay Copeland
  36. Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility: Sustainable Value Creation, 5th Edition: David Chandler
  37. Julien's Primer of Drug Action: A Comprehensive Guide to the Actions, Uses, and Side Effects of Psychoactive Drugs, 14th Edition: Claire D. Advokat & Joseph Comaty & Robert Julien
  38. The Grand Chessboard: American Primacy And Its Geostrategic Imperatives, 1st Edition: Zbigniew Brzezinski
  39. The Cosmic Perspective: The Solar System, 8th Edition: Jeffrey O. Bennett & Megan O. Donahue & Nicholas Schneider & Mark Voit
  40. Ultrastructure Atlas of Human Tissues, 1st Edition: Fred Hossler
  41. Advances in the Biology and Management of Modern Bed Bugs, 1st Edition: Stephen L. Doggett & Dini M. Miller & Chow-Yang Lee
  42. Patterns of World History: Volume One: To 1600, 1st Edition: Peter von Sivers & Charles A. Desnoyers & George B. Stow
  43. Genitourinary Imaging: A Core Review, 1st Edition: Matthew Davenport
  44. Evidence-based Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1st Edition: Errol R. Norwitz & Carolyn M. Zelop & David A. Miller & David L. Keefe
  45. Zoology, 10th Edition: Stephen Miller & John Harley
  46. Radical and Reconstructive Gynecologic Cancer Surgery, 1st Edition: Robert Bristow & Dennis Chi
  47. Davis's Diseases & Disorders A Nursing Therapeutics Manual, 6th Edition: Marilyn Sawyer Sommers
  48. Management & Cost Accounting, 6th Edition: Alnoor Bhimani
  49. Elements of Modern Algebra, 8th Edition: Linda Gilbert
  50. Psychiatric & Mental Health Nursing, 4th Edition: Katie Evans & Debra Nizette & Anthony O'Brien
  51. Molecular Biology: Different Facets, 1st Edition: Anjali Priyadarshini & Prerna Pandey
  52. Elementary Number Theory, 7th Edition: David Burton
  53. Accounting Information Systems, 14th Edition: Marshall B. Romney & Paul J. Steinbart
  54. Microeconomics, Global Edition, 9th Edition: Robert Pindyck & Daniel Rubinfeld
  55. Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing Demystified, 1st Edition: Jim Keogh
  56. Entrepreneurship, 10th Edition: Robert Hisrich & Michael Peters & Dean Shepherd
  57. Ganong's Review of Medical Physiology, 26th Edition: Kim E. Barrett & Susan M. Barman & Jason Yuan & Heddwen L. Brooks
  58. Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology: A life course approach, 1st Edition: Eric A.P. Steegers & Bart C.J.M. Fauser & Carina G.J.M. Hilders
  59. Engineering Mechanics: Statics, 8th Edition: James L. Meriam & L. G. Kraige & J. N. Bolton
  60. Basic Concepts of Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing, 8th Edition: Louise Rebraca Shives
  61. Beckmann and Ling's Obstetrics and Gynecology, 8th Edition: Robert Casanova
  62. Biology: Concepts and Applications, 10th Edition: Cecie Starr & Christine Evers & Lisa Starr
  63. Estimating in Building Construction, 9th Edition: Steven J. Peterson & Frank R. Dagostino
  64. The Big Back Book: Tips & Tricks for Therapists, 1st Edition: Jane Johnson
  65. University Physics with Modern Physics, 14th Edition: Hugh D. Young & Roger A. Freedman
  66. Poisoning and Drug Overdose, 7th Edition: Kent Olson & Ilene Anderson & Neal Benowitz & Paul Blanc
  67. Koneman's Color Atlas and Textbook of Diagnostic Microbiology, 7th Edition: Gary W. Procop
  68. Experimental Psychology, 7th Edition: Anne Myers & Christine H. Hansen
  69. Marketing: An Introduction, 13th Edition: Gary Armstrong & Philip Kotler
  70. Gray's Anatomy for Students: With Student Consult, 3rd Edition: Richard Drake & A. Wayne Vogl & Adam W. M. Mitchell
  71. Chestnut's Obstetric Anesthesia: Principles and Practice, 5th Edition: David H. Chestnut & Cynthia A Wong & Lawrence C Tsen & Warwick D Ngan Kee & Yaakov Beilin & Jill Mhyre
  72. Chemistry: The Molecular Science, 5th Edition: John W. Moore & Conrad L. Stanitski
  73. Head, Neck and Dental Emergencies, 2nd Edition: Mike Perry
  74. Wong's Nursing Care of Infants and Children, 10th Edition: Marilyn J. Hockenberry & David Wilson
  75. Sports Emergency Care: A Team Approach, 3rd Edition: Robb Rehberg & Jeff G. Konin
  76. New Venture Creation: Entrepreneurship for the 21st Century, 10th Edition: Stephen Spinelli & Rob Adams
  77. Caring for the Vulnerable: Perspectives in Nursing Theory, Practice, and Research, 5th Edition: Mary de Chesnay & Barbara Anderson
  78. Geometry: The Line and the Circle: Maureen T. Carroll & Elyn Rykken
  79. Histories of Human Engineering: Tact and Technology: Maarten Derksen
  80. Land Restoration: Reclaiming Landscapes for a Sustainable Future, 1st Edition: Ilan Chabay & Martin Frick & Jennifer Helgeson
  81. Yamada's Handbook of Gastroenterology, 3rd Edition: Tadataka Yamada & John M. Inadomi & Renuka Bhattacharya & Jason A. Dominitz & Joo Ha Hwang
  82. Theoretical Physics 9: Fundamentals of Many-body Physics, 2nd Edition: Wolfgang Nolting & William D. Brewer
  83. Introduction to Programming with C++, 3rd Edition: Y. Daniel Liang
  84. Dental Emergencies, 1st Edition: Mark Greenwood & Ian Corbett
  85. Fundamentals of Physics and Chemistry of the Atmosphere, 2nd Edition: Guido Visconti
  86. Calculus: Early Transcendentals, 3rd Edition: William L. Briggs & Lyle Cochran & Bernard Gillett & Eric Schulz
  87. Educating Physical Therapists, 1st Edition: Gail Jensen
  88. Strategic Developments in Eurasia After 11 September, 1st Edition: Shireen Hunter
  89. Contemporary Issues in Healthcare Law and Ethics, 4th Edition: Dean Harris
  90. Transitioning from RN to MSN: Principles of Professional Role Development: Brenda Scott & Mindy Thompson
  91. Principles and Practice of Public Health Surveillance, 3rd Edition: Lisa M. Lee & Steven M. Teutsch & Stephen B. Thacker & Michael E. St. Louis
  92. Elementary Statistics: Picturing the World, 6th Edition: Ron Larson & Betsy Farber
  93. Human Sexuality in a World of Diversity, 6th Canadian Edition: Spencer A. Rathus & Jeffrey S. Nevid & Lois Fichner-Rathus & Alex McKay & Robin Milhausen
  94. Becoming Your Own Banker, 6th Edition: R. Nelson Nash
  95. Murach's MySQL, 3rd Edition: Joel Murach
  96. Intermediate Algebra, 13th Edition: Marvin L. Bittinger & Judith A. Beecher & Barbara L. Johnson
  97. Planning Health Promotion Programs: An Intervention Mapping Approach, 4th Edition: L. Kay Bartholomew Eldredge & Christine M. Markham & Robert A. C. Ruiter & Maria E. Fernández & Gerjo Kok & Guy S. Parcel
  98. Human Factors in Simple and Complex Systems, 3rd Edition: Robert W. Proctor & Trisha Van Zandt
  99. The Irony of Democracy: An Uncommon Introduction to American Politics, 17th Edition: Louis Schubert & Thomas R. Dye & Harmon Zeigler
  100. Understanding Earth, 7th Edition: John Grotzinger
  101. Nursing Research in Canada: Methods, Critical Appraisal, and Utilization, 4th Edition: Geri LoBiondo-Wood & Judith Haber & Cherylyn Cameron & Mina Singh
  102. The Philosophy of Film, 1st Edition: Thomas E. Wartenberg & Angela Curran
  103. Disaster Nursing and Emergency Preparedness, 4th Edition: Tener Goodwin Veenema
  104. Language in Mind: An Introduction to Psycholinguistics, 2nd Edition: Julie Sedivy
  105. Medical Anthropology: A Biocultural Approach, 3rd Edition: Andrea S. Wiley & John S. Allen
  106. Exploring Biology in the Laboratory, 3rd Edition: Murray P. Pendarvis & John L. Crawley
  107. Guide to Networking Essentials, 8th Edition: Greg Tomsho
  108. Social Psychology: A Storytelling Approach, 2nd Edition: Leonard Newman & Ralph Erber
  109. Managing Conflict: An Introspective Journey to Negotiating Skills, 1st Edition: Dorothy Balancio
  110. Environmental Change and Challenge: A Canadian Perspective, 5th Edition: Philip Dearden & Bruce Mitchell
  111. Brain and Behavior: A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective, 1st Edition: David Eagleman & Jonathan Downar
  112. Cardiac/Vascular Nurse Exam Secrets Study Guide: Cardiac/Vascular Nurse Test Review for the Cardiac/Vascular Nurse Exam: Mometrix Media & Cardiac Vascular Nurse Exam Secrets
  113. Keeping the Republic: Power and Citizenship in American Politics, The Essentials, 9th Edition: Christine Barbour & Gerald Wright
  114. Principles of Environmental Science, 9th Edition: William Cunningham & Mary Cunningham
  115. Thomas' Calculus, 14th Edition: Joel R. Hass & Christopher E. Heil & Maurice D. Weir
  116. Pharmacology for Canadian Pharmacy Technicians, 1st Edition: Leland Norman Holland & Michael P. Adams & Jeanine Lynn Brice & Heather V. LeBlanc
  117. Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 9th Edition: Abul K. Abbas & Andrew H. Lichtman & Shiv Pillai
  118. Operations Management: Processes and Supply Chains, 11th Edition: Lee J. Krajewski & Manoj K. Malhotra & Larry P. Ritzman
  119. Jews, Christians, Muslims: A Comparative Introduction to Monotheistic Religions, 2nd Edition: John Corrigan & Frederick Denny & Martin S Jaffee & Carlos Eire
  120. Professional Nursing: Concepts & Challenges, 9th Edition: Beth Black
  121. Practical Homicide Investigation: Tactics, Procedures, and Forensic Techniques, 4th Edition: Vernon J. Geberth
  122. Fundamentals of Modern Manufacturing: Materials, Processes and Systems, 7th Edition: Mikell P. Groover
  123. Genetics: A Conceptual Approach, 7th Edition: Benjamin A. Pierce
  124. Computer Science Illuminated, 7th Edition: Nell Dale & John Lewis
  125. The Globalization of World Politics: An Introduction to International Relations, 8th Edition: John Baylis & Steve Smith & Patricia Owens
  126. Behavioral Neuroscience, 9th Edition: S. Marc Breedlove & Neil V. Watson
  127. Canadian Human Resource Management: A Strategic Approach, 12th Edition: Hermann Schwind & Krista Uggerslev & Terry Wagar & Neil Fassina
  128. Brief Principles of Macroeconomics, 9th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  129. Living in the Environment, 4th Canadian Edition: G. Miller & Dave Hackett & Carl Wolfe
  130. Principles of Economics, 9th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  131. Principles of Microeconomics, 9th Edition: N. Gregory Mankiw
  132. Child Development, 9th Edition: Laura E. Berk
  133. Home, School, and Community Collaboration: Culturally Responsive Family Engagement, 4th Edition: Kathy Beth Grant & Julie A. Ray
  134. Set Lighting Technician's Handbook, 4th Edition: Harry Box
  135. Clinical Nurse Leader Certification Review, 2nd Edition: Cynthia R. King
  136. Basic Chemistry, 4th Edition: Karen C. Timberlake & William Timberlake
  137. Sparks & Taylor's Nursing Diagnosis Pocket Guide, 3rd Edition: Linda Phelps
  138. Family Theories: Foundations and Applications, 1st Edition: Katherine R. Allen & Angela C. Henderson
  139. The Earth and Its Peoples: A Global History, 7th Edition: Richard Bulliet & Pamela Crossley & Daniel Headrick & Steven Hirsch & Lyman Johnson
  140. Sociology in Action: A Canadian Perspective, 3rd Edition: Tami Bereska & Diane Symbaluk
  141. Operations Management: Processes and Supply Chains, 12th Edition: Lee J. Krajewski & Manoj K. Malhotra & Larry P. Ritzman
  142. Introduction to Food Science and Food Systems, 2nd Edition: Rick Parker & Miriah Pace
  143. Liaisons, Student Edition: An Introduction to French, 3rd Edition: Wynne Wong & Stacey Weber-Fève & Bill VanPatten
  144. Zuckerman Parker Handbook of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics for Primary Care, 4th Edition: Marilyn Augustyn & Barry Zuckerman
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  146. The Biological Basis of Mental Health, 3rd Edition: William T. Blows
  147. Developing and Managing Electronic Collections: The Essentials: Peggy Johnson
  148. Western Civilization: Volume II: Since 1500, 10th Edition: Jackson J. Spielvogel
  149. Talking to Strangers: What We Should Know about the People We Don't Know, 1st Edition: Malcolm Gladwell
  150. Understanding Pathophysiology, 7th Edition: Sue E. Huether & Kathryn L. McCance
  151. Our Environment: A Canadian Perspective, 5th edition: Dianne Draper & Ann Zimmerman
  152. Criminal Law: Cases and Materials, 8th Edition: John Kaplan & Robert Weisberg & Guyora Binder
  153. A Photographic Atlas of Histology, 2nd Edition: Michael J Leboffe
  154. Dragons and Tigers: A Geography of South, East, and Southeast Asia, 3rd Edition: Barbara A. Weightman
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  156. The Power of Critical Thinking: 5th Canadian Edition: Chris MacDonald and Lewis Vaughn
  157. Principles of Fire Behavior and Combustion, 4th Edition: Richard Gann & Raymond Friedman
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  160. A Practical Guide to Computer Forensics Investigations, 1st Edition: Darren R. Hayes
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  162. Essay Writing for Canadian Students, 8th Edition: Roger Davis & Laura K. Davis
  163. Biology, 11th Edition: Peter Raven & George Johnson & Kenneth Mason & Jonathan Losos & Susan Singer
  164. Molecular Imaging, 1st Edition: Ralph Weissleder& Brian D. Ross & Alnawaz Rehemtulla & Sanjiv Sam Gambhir
  165. Criminology, 4th Edition: Frank Schmalleger
  166. A Theory of Truthmaking: Metaphysics, Ontology, and Reality: Jamin Asay
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  168. Linear Algebra and Its Applications, 5th Edition: David C. Lay & Steven R. Lay & Judi J. McDonald
  169. Essentials of Human Communication, 9th Edition: Joseph A. DeVito
  170. Economics: Principles, Applications, and Tools, 9th Edition, Global Edition: Arthur O'Sullivan & Steven Sheffrin & Stephen Perez
  171. Global Health 101, 3rd Edition: Richard Skolnik
  172. Mathematical Proofs: A Transition to Advanced Mathematics, 4th Edition: Gary Chartrand & Albert D. Polimeni & Ping Zhang
  173. Concepts in Strategic Management and Business Policy: Globalization, Innovation and Sustainability, 15th Edition, Global Edition: Thomas L. Wheelen & J. David Hunger & Alan N. Hoffman & Charles E. Bamford
  174. Chemistry: The Central Science, 14th Edition, Global Edition: Theodore E. Brown & H. Eugene LeMay & Bruce E. Bursten & Catherine Murphy & Patrick Woodward & Matthew E. Stoltzfus
  175. Biopsychology, 10th Edition, Global Edition: John P. J. Pinel & Steven Barnes
  176. Electric Circuits, 11th Edition: James W. Nilsson & Susan Riedel
  177. Keeping the Republic; Power and Citizenship in American Politics, the Essentials, 8th Edition: Christine Barbour & Gerald C Wright
  178. Applied Behavior Analysis: Pearson New International Edition, 2nd Edition: John O. Cooper & Timothy E. Heron & William L. Heward
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  180. Operating Systems: Internals and Design Principles, 9th Edition, Global Edition: William Stallings
  181. Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives, 9th Edition, Global Edition: John C. Hull
  182. Invitation to the Psychology of Religion, 3rd Edition: Raymond F. Paloutzian
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  332. Global Business Ethics: Responsible Decision Making in an International Context, 1st Edition: Ronald D Francis & Guy Murfey
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submitted by bookseller10 to Textbook_releases [link] [comments]

[ANN][ANDROID MINING][AIRDROP] NewEnglandcoin: Scrypt RandomSpike

New England
New England 6 States Songs: https://www.reddit.com/newengland/comments/er8wxd/new_england_6_states_songs/
NewEnglandcoin
Symbol: NENG
NewEnglandcoin is a clone of Bitcoin using scrypt as a proof-of-work algorithm with enhanced features to protect against 51% attack and decentralize on mining to allow diversified mining rigs across CPUs, GPUs, ASICs and Android phones.
Mining Algorithm: Scrypt with RandomSpike. RandomSpike is 3rd generation of Dynamic Difficulty (DynDiff) algorithm on top of scrypt.
1 minute block targets base difficulty reset: every 1440 blocks subsidy halves in 2.1m blocks (~ 2 to 4 years) 84,000,000,000 total maximum NENG 20000 NENG per block Pre-mine: 1% - reserved for dev fund ICO: None RPCPort: 6376 Port: 6377
NewEnglandcoin has dogecoin like supply at 84 billion maximum NENG. This huge supply insures that NENG is suitable for retail transactions and daily use. The inflation schedule of NengEnglandcoin is actually identical to that of Litecoin. Bitcoin and Litecoin are already proven to be great long term store of value. The Litecoin-like NENG inflation schedule will make NewEnglandcoin ideal for long term investment appreciation as the supply is limited and capped at a fixed number
Bitcoin Fork - Suitable for Home Hobbyists
NewEnglandcoin core wallet continues to maintain version tag of "Satoshi v0.8.7.5" because NewEnglandcoin is very much an exact clone of bitcoin plus some mining feature changes with DynDiff algorithm. NewEnglandcoin is very suitable as lite version of bitcoin for educational purpose on desktop mining, full node running and bitcoin programming using bitcoin-json APIs.
The NewEnglandcoin (NENG) mining algorithm original upgrade ideas were mainly designed for decentralization of mining rigs on scrypt, which is same algo as litecoin/dogecoin. The way it is going now is that NENG is very suitable for bitcoin/litecoin/dogecoin hobbyists who can not , will not spend huge money to run noisy ASIC/GPU mining equipments, but still want to mine NENG at home with quiet simple CPU/GPU or with a cheap ASIC like FutureBit Moonlander 2 USB or Apollo pod on solo mining setup to obtain very decent profitable results. NENG allows bitcoin litecoin hobbyists to experience full node running, solo mining, CPU/GPU/ASIC for a fun experience at home at cheap cost without breaking bank on equipment or electricity.
MIT Free Course - 23 lectures about Bitcoin, Blockchain and Finance (Fall,2018)
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLUl4u3cNGP63UUkfL0onkxF6MYgVa04Fn
CPU Minable Coin Because of dynamic difficulty algorithm on top of scrypt, NewEnglandcoin is CPU Minable. Users can easily set up full node for mining at Home PC or Mac using our dedicated cheetah software.
Research on the first forked 50 blocks on v1.2.0 core confirmed that ASIC/GPU miners mined 66% of 50 blocks, CPU miners mined the remaining 34%.
NENG v1.4.0 release enabled CPU mining inside android phones.
Youtube Video Tutorial
How to CPU Mine NewEnglandcoin (NENG) in Windows 10 Part 1 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdOoPvAjzlE How to CPU Mine NewEnglandcoin (NENG) in Windows 10 Part 2 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nHnRJvJRzZg
How to CPU Mine NewEnglandcoin (NENG) in macOS https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zj7NLMeNSOQ
Decentralization and Community Driven NewEnglandcoin is a decentralized coin just like bitcoin. There is no boss on NewEnglandcoin. Nobody nor the dev owns NENG.
We know a coin is worth nothing if there is no backing from community. Therefore, we as dev do not intend to make decision on this coin solely by ourselves. It is our expectation that NewEnglandcoin community will make majority of decisions on direction of this coin from now on. We as dev merely view our-self as coin creater and technical support of this coin while providing NENG a permanent home at ShorelineCrypto Exchange.
Twitter Airdrop
Follow NENG twitter and receive 100,000 NENG on Twitter Airdrop to up to 1000 winners
Graphic Redesign Bounty
Top one award: 90.9 million NENG Top 10 Winners: 500,000 NENG / person Event Timing: March 25, 2019 - Present Event Address: NewEnglandcoin DISCORD at: https://discord.gg/UPeBwgs
Please complete above Twitter Bounty requirement first. Then follow Below Steps to qualify for the Bounty: (1) Required: submit your own designed NENG logo picture in gif, png jpg or any other common graphic file format into DISCORD "bounty-submission" board (2) Optional: submit a second graphic for logo or any other marketing purposes into "bounty-submission" board. (3) Complete below form.
Please limit your submission to no more than two total. Delete any wrongly submitted or undesired graphics in the board. Contact DISCORD u/honglu69#5911 or u/krypton#6139 if you have any issues.
Twitter Airdrop/Graphic Redesign bounty sign up: https://goo.gl/forms/L0vcwmVi8c76cR7m1
Milestones
Roadmap
NENG v1.4.0 Android Mining, randomSpike Evaluation https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/download/NENG_2020_Q3_report/NENG_2020_Q3_report.pdf
RandomSpike - NENG core v1.3.0 Hardfork Upgrade Proposal https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/download/2020Q1_Report/Scrypt_RandomSpike_NENGv1.3.0_Hardfork_Proposal.pdf
NENG Security, Decentralization & Valuation
https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/download/2019Q2_report/NENG_Security_Decentralization_Value.pdf
Whitepaper v1.0 https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/download/whitepaper_v1.0/NENG_WhitePaper.pdf
DISCORD https://discord.gg/UPeBwgs
Explorer
http://www.findblocks.com/exploreNENG http://86.100.49.209/exploreNENG http://nengexplorer.mooo.com:3001/
Step by step guide on how to setup an explorer: https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/nengexplorer
Github https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin
Wallet
Android with UserLand App (arm64/armhf), Chromebook (x64/arm64/armhf): https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.4.0.5
Linux Wallet (Ubuntu/Linux Mint, Debian/MX Linux, Arch/Manjaro, Fedora, openSUSE): https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.4.0.3
MacOS Wallet (10.11 El Capitan or higher): https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.4.0.2
Android with GNUroot on 32 bits old Phones (alpha release) wallet: https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.4.0
Windows wallet: https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/NewEnglandCoin/releases/tag/v1.3.0.1
addnode ip address for the wallet to sync faster, frequently updated conf file: https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/cheetah_cpumineblob/mastenewenglandcoin.conf-example
How to Sync Full Node Desktop Wallet https://www.reddit.com/NewEnglandCoin/comments/er6f0q/how_to_sync_full_node_desktop_wallet/
TWITTER https://twitter.com/newenglandcoin
REDDIT https://www.reddit.com/NewEnglandCoin/
Cheetah CPU Miner Software https://github.com/ShorelineCrypto/cheetah_cpuminer
Solo Mining with GPU or ASIC https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg52187727#msg52187727
How to Run Two Full Node in Same Desktop PC https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg53581449#msg53581449
ASIC/GPU Mining Pools Warning to Big ASIC Miners Due to DynDiff Algo on top of Scrypt, solo mining is recommended for ASIC/GPU miners. Further more, even for mining pools, small mining pool will generate better performance than big NENG mining pool because of new algo v1.2.x post hard fork.
The set up configuration of NENG for scrypt pool mining is same as a typical normal scrypt coin. In other word, DynDiff on Scrypt algo is backward compatible with Scrypt algo. Because ASIC/GPU miners rely on CPU miners for smooth blockchain movement, checkout bottom of "Latest News" section for A WARNING to All ASIC miners before you decide to dump big ASIC hash rate into NENG mining.
(1) Original DynDiff Warning: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48324708#msg48324708 (2) New Warning on RandomSpike Spike difficulty (244k) introduced in RandomSpike served as roadblocks to instant mining and provide security against 51% attack risk. However, this spike difficulty like a roadblock that makes big ASIC mining less profitable. In case of spike block to be mined, the spike difficulty immediately serve as base difficulty, which will block GPU/ASIC miners effectively and leave CPU cheetah solo miners dominating mining almost 100% until next base difficulty reset.
FindBlocks http://findblocks.com/
CRpool http://crpool.xyz/
Cminors' Pool http://newenglandcoin.cminors-pool.com/
SPOOL https://spools.online/
Exchange
📷
https://shorelinecrypto.com/
Features: anonymous sign up and trading. No restriction or limit on deposit or withdraw.
The trading pairs available: NewEnglandcoin (NENG) / Dogecoin (DOGE)
Trading commission: A round trip trading will incur 0.10% trading fees in average. Fees are paid only on buyer side. buy fee: 0.2% / sell fee: 0% Deposit fees: free for all coins Withdraw fees: ZERO per withdraw. Mining fees are appointed by each coin blockchain. To cover the blockchain mining fees, there is minimum balance per coin per account: * Dogecoin 2 DOGE * NewEnglandcoin 1 NENG
Latest News Aug 30, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.5 Released for Android/Chromebook Upgrade with armhf, better hardware support https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg55098029#msg55098029
Aug 11, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.4 Released for Android arm64 Upgrade / Chromebook Support https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54977437#msg54977437
Jul 30, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.3 Released for Linux Wallet Upgrade with 8 Distros https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54898540#msg54898540
Jul 21, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.2 Released for MacOS Upgrade with Catalina https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54839522#msg54839522
Jul 19, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0.1 Released for MacOS Wallet Upgrade https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54830333#msg54830333
Jul 15, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0 Released for Android Mining, Ubuntu 20.04 support https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54803639#msg54803639
Jul 11, 2020 - NENG v1.4.0 Android Mining, randomSpike Evaluation https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54777222#msg54777222
Jun 27, 2020 - Pre-Announce: NENG v1.4.0 Proposal for Mobile Miner Upgrade, Android Mining Start in July 2020 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54694233#msg54694233
Jun 19, 2020 - Best Practice for Futurebit Moonlander2 USB ASIC on solo mining mode https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54645726#msg54645726
Mar 15, 2020 - Scrypt RandomSpike - NENG v1.3.0.1 Released for better wallet syncing https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg54030923#msg54030923
Feb 23, 2020 - Scrypt RandomSpike - NENG Core v1.3.0 Relased, Hardfork on Mar 1 https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg53900926#msg53900926
Feb 1, 2020 - Scrypt RandomSpike Proposal Published- NENG 1.3.0 Hardfork https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg53735458#msg53735458
Jan 15, 2020 - NewEnglandcoin Dev Team Expanded with New Kickoff https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg53617358#msg53617358
Jan 12, 2020 - Explanation of Base Diff Reset and Effect of Supply https://www.reddit.com/NewEnglandCoin/comments/envmo1/explanation_of_base_diff_reset_and_effect_of/
Dec 19, 2019 - Shoreline_tradingbot version 1.0 is released https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5121953.msg53391184#msg53391184
Sept 1, 2019 - NewEnglandcoin (NENG) is Selected as Shoreline Tradingbot First Supported Coin https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg52331201#msg52331201
Aug 15, 2019 - Mining Update on Effect of Base Difficulty Reset, GPU vs ASIC https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg52169572#msg52169572
Jul 7, 2019 - CPU Mining on macOS Mojave is supported under latest Cheetah_Cpuminer Release https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg51745839#msg51745839
Jun 1, 2019 - NENG Fiat project is stopped by Square, Inc https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg51312291#msg51312291
Apr 21, 2019 - NENG Fiat Project is Launched by ShorelineCrypto https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50714764#msg50714764
Apr 7, 2019 - Announcement of Fiat Project for all U.S. Residents & Mobile Miner Project Initiation https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50506585#msg50506585
Apr 1, 2019 - Disclosure on Large Buying on NENG at ShorelineCrypto Exchange https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50417196#msg50417196
Mar 27, 2019 - Disclosure on Large Buying on NENG at ShorelineCrypto Exchange https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50332097#msg50332097
Mar 17, 2019 - Disclosure on Large Buying on NENG at ShorelineCrypto Exchange https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg50208194#msg50208194
Feb 26, 2019 - Community Project - NewEnglandcoin Graphic Redesign Bounty Initiated https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49931305#msg49931305
Feb 22, 2019 - Dev Policy on Checkpoints on NewEnglandcoin https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49875242#msg49875242
Feb 20, 2019 - NewEnglandCoin v1.2.1 Released to Secure the Hard Kork https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49831059#msg49831059
Feb 11, 2019 - NewEnglandCoin v1.2.0 Released, Anti-51% Attack, Anti-instant Mining after Hard Fork https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49685389#msg49685389
Jan 13, 2019 - Cheetah_CpuMiner added support for CPU Mining on Mac https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49218760#msg49218760
Jan 12, 2019 - NENG Core v1.1.2 Released to support MacOS OSX Wallet https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49202088#msg49202088
Jan 2, 2019 - Cheetah_Cpuminer v1.1.0 is released for both Linux and Windows https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg49004345#msg49004345
Dec 31, 2018 - Technical Whitepaper is Released https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48990334#msg48990334
Dec 28, 2018 - Cheetah_Cpuminer v1.0.0 is released for Linux https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48935135#msg48935135
Update on Dec 14, 2018 - NENG Blockchain Stuck Issue https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48668375#msg48668375
Nov 27, 2018 - Exclusive for PC CPU Miners - How to Steal a Block from ASIC Miners https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48258465#msg48258465
Nov 28, 2018 - How to CPU Mine a NENG block with window/linux PC https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48298311#msg48298311
Nov 29, 2018 - A Warning to ASIC Miners https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=5027091.msg48324708#msg48324708
Disclosure: Dev Team Came from ShorelineCrypto, a US based Informatics Service Business offering Fee for service for Coin Creation, Coin Exchange Listing, Blockchain Consulting, etc.
submitted by honglu69 to NewEnglandCoin [link] [comments]

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